The Gentleman's Magazine, 253. köide

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Bradbury, Evans, 1882
 

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Page 235 - So that if the invention of the ship was thought so noble, which carrieth riches and commodities from place to place, and consociateth the most remote regions in participation of their fruits, how much more are letters to be magnified, which as ships pass through the vast seas of time, and make ages so distant to participate of the wisdom, illuminations, and inventions, the one of the other?
Page 420 - The City's voice itself is soft like Solitude's. I see the Deep's untrampled floor With green and purple seaweeds strown; I see the waves upon the shore, Like light dissolved in star-showers, thrown : I sit upon the sands alone, The lightning of the noontide ocean Is...
Page 122 - With lust and violence the house of God? In courts and palaces he also reigns, And in luxurious cities, where the noise Of riot ascends above their loftiest towers, And injury, and outrage: And when night Darkens the streets, then wander forth the sons Of Belial, flown with insolence and wine.
Page 325 - ART thou the bird whom Man loves best, The pious bird with the scarlet breast, Our little English Robin ; The bird that comes about our doors When Autumn winds are sobbing...
Page 591 - That fill the haunted chambers of the Night, Like some old poet's rhymes. From the cool cisterns of the midnight air, My spirit drank repose; The fountain of perpetual peace flows there, — From those deep cisterns flows.
Page 604 - All things had put their evil nature off: I cannot tell my joy, when o'er a lake Upon a drooping bough with nightshade twined, I saw two azure halcyons clinging downward And thinning one bright bunch of amber berries...
Page 700 - ACT V. SCENE I.— Mantua. A Street. Enter ROMEO. Rom. If I may trust the flattering eye of sleep, My dreams presage some joyful news at hand : My bosom's lord sits lightly in his throne; And, all this day, an unaccustom'd spirit Lifts me above the ground with cheerful thoughts.
Page 612 - Why sleep'st thou, Eve? now is the pleasant time, The cool, the silent, save where silence yields To the night-warbling bird, that now awake Tunes sweetest his love-labour'd song, now reigns Full orb'd the moon, and with more pleasing light Shadowy sets off the face of things, in vain, If none regard; heaven wakes with all his eyes, Whom to behold but thee, nature's desire?
Page 592 - Joyous as morning Thou art laughing and scorning; Thou hast a nest for thy love and thy rest, And, though little troubled with sloth, Drunken Lark! thou would'st be loth To be such a traveller as I. Happy, happy Liver, With a soul as strong as a mountain river Pouring out praise to the Almighty Giver, Joy and jollity be with us both!
Page 419 - But cawing rooks, and kites that swim sublime In still repeated circles, screaming loud, The jay, the pie, and e'en the boding owl, That hails the rising moon, have charms for me. Sounds inharmonious in themselves and harsh, Yet heard in scenes where peace for ever reigns, And only there, please highly for their sake.

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