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Τ Ο Τ Η Ε

K I N G.

TI

HO'train'd in arms, and learn'd in martial artsy

Thou chuseft not to conquer men, but hearts.
Expecting nations for thy triumphs wait,
But thou prefer'st the name of just to great.
So Jove fufpends his subject world to doom,
Which would he please to thunder, he 'd consume.

() ! could the ghosts of mighty heroes dead
Return on earth, and quit th’Elysian fhade,
Brutus to James would trust the people's cause,
Thy justice is a stronger guard than law's :
Marius and Sylla would resign to thee,
Nor Cesar, and great Poinpey, rivals be,
Or rivals only who should best obey,
And Cato gives his voice for regal sway.

Τ Ο Τ Η Ε

K I N G.

HEROES of old, by rapine and by spoil,

In search of fame did all the world cmbroil.
Thus to their gods each then ally'd his name,
This sprang from Jove, and that from Titan came.
With equal valour, and the same success,
Dread king, might'st thou the universe oppress.
But christian laws constrain thy martial pride,
Peace is thy choice, and picty thy guide;

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By thy example kings are taught to sway,
Heroes to fight, and saints may learn to pray.

The Grecian leaders were but half divine;
Nestor in council, and Ulysses shine :
But in the day of combat, all would yield
To the fierce master of the seven-fold Thield.
Their

very

deities were grac'd no more,
Mars had the courage, Jove the thunder bore :
But all perfections meet in James alone,
And Britain's king is all the gods in one.

Mr. WALLER to the Author, on his foregoing

Verses to the KING.

AN

N early plant, which such a hlossom bears,

And shows a genius so beyond his years,
A judgement that could make so fair a choice,
So high a subject to employ his voice,
Still as it grows, how sweetly will he fing,
The growing greatness of our matchlets king!

Τ Ο

MR.

W ALL E R.

WHEN into Libya the

Grecian came,

young
To talk with Hammon, and confult for fame,
When from the sacred tripod where he stood,
The priest inspir’d faluted him a god;
Scarce such a joy that haughty victor knew,
So own’d by hearen, as I thus prais'd by you:

Whoe'er their names can in thy numbers show,
Have more than empire, and immortal grow;
Ages to come ihall scorn the powers of old,
When in thy verse of greater gods they ’re told ;
Our beauteous queen, and martial monarch's naine,
For Jove and Juno shall be plac'd by Fame,
Thy Charles for Neptune shall the seas command,
And Sacharilla shall for Venus stand;
Greece shall no longer boast, nor haughty Rome,
But think from Britain all the gods did come.

TO THE

IMMORTAL MEMORY OF MR. WALLER,

UPON

HIS

D Ε Α Τ Η. .

A Like partaking of celestial fire,

Poets and heroes to renown aspire ;
Till, crown'd with honour and immortal name,
By wit, or valour, led to equal fame,
They mingle with the gods, that breath'd the noble

fame :
Homer shall last like Alexander long,
As much recorded, and as often sung.

A tree of life is facred poetry;
Sweet is thy fruit, and tempting to the eye.
Many there are who nibble without leave;
But none, who are not born to taste, survive.

Waller

TO THE MEMORY OF MR. WALLER. 133
Waller shall never die, of life fecure,
As long as Fame or aged Time endure :
Waller, the Muse's darling, free to taste
Of all their stores, the master of the feast ;
Not like old Adam stinted in his choice,
But lord of all the spacious paradise.

Those foes to virtue, fortune, and mankind,
Favouring his fame, once to do justice join'd;
No carping critick interrupts his praise,
No rival itrives, but for a second place:
No want constrain'd, the writer's usual fate;
A
poet,

with a plentiful estate ;
The first of mortals, who before the tomb
Struck the pernicious monster, Envy, dumb,
Malice and Pride, those savages, disarm’d;
Not Orpheus with such powerful magic charm'd.
Scarce in the grave can we allow him more
Than, living, we agreed to give before.

His noble Mufe employ'd her generous rage
In crowning virtue, fcorning to engage
The vice and follies of an impious age :
No satyr lurks within this hallow'd ground,
But nymphs and heroines, kings and gods abound,
Glory, and arms, and love, is all the found :
His Eden with no serpent is dcfil'd,
But all is gay, delicious all, and mild.

Mistaken men his Muse of flattery blame,
Adorning twice an impious tyrant's name:
We raise our own, by giving fame to foes ;
The valour that he prais’d he did opposc..

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Nor were his thoughts to poetry confin’d,
The state and business shar'd his ample mind :
As all the fair were captives to his wit,
So fenates to his counsels would submit :
His voice so soft, his cloquence so itrong.
Like Cato's was his speech, like Ovid's was his fong.

Our British kings are rais'd above the hearse,
Immortal made in bis immortal verse ;
No more are Mars and Jove poetic themes,
But the celestial Charles's and just James :
Juno and Pallas, all the shining race
Of heavenly beauties, to the queen give place ;
Clear like her brow, and graceful was his song,
Great like her mind, and like her virtuc strong.

Parent of gods, who do'st to gods remove,
Where art thou plac'd, and which thy f-at above !
Waller the god of verse we will proclaim,
Not Phæbus now, but W'aller be his name;
Of joyful bards the sweet seraphic quire
Acknowledge thee their oracle and fire ;
The spheres do homage, and the Muses sing
Waller the god of verse, who was the king.

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ON THE QUEEN'S PICTURE,

GIVEN IN EXCHANGE FOR ANOTHER.

OF

F the rude Indians, artless and untaught,

So brightest jewels are with trifles bought : Deceivid Ixion's fate revers d is show'd, Imperial Juno given for a cloud.

Ο Ν

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