The life of Samuel Johnson ... including A journal of his tour to the Hebrides. To which are added, Anecdotes by Hawkins, Piozzi, &c. and notes by various hands, 8. köide

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Page 392 - Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased ; Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow ; Raze out the written troubles of the brain ; And, with some sweet, oblivious antidote, Cleanse the stuffed bosom of that perilous stuff, Which weighs upon the heart ? Doct.
Page 79 - ... retorting an objection: sometimes it is couched in a bold scheme of speech, in a tart irony, in a lusty hyperbole, in a startling metaphor, in a plausible reconciling of contradictions, or in acute nonsense : sometimes a scenical representation of persons or things, a counterfeit speech, a...
Page 118 - CONDEMN'D to Hope's delusive mine. As on we toil from day to day, By sudden blast or slow decline Our social comforts drop away. Well try'd through many a varying year, See LEVETT to the grave descend ; Officious, innocent, sincere, Of every friendless name the friend.
Page 42 - See what a grace was seated on this brow ; Hyperion's curls, the front of Jove himself, An eye like Mars, to threaten and command ; A station like the herald Mercury New- lighted on a heaven-kissing hill...
Page 268 - Here was exemplified what Goldsmith said of him, with the aid of a very witty image from one of Gibber's Comedies : ' There is no arguing with Johnson ; for if his pistol misses fire, he knocks you down with the butt end of it...
Page 65 - And, behold, the veil of the temple was rent in twain from the top to the bottom ; and the earth did quake, and the rocks rent; and the graves were opened; and many bodies of the saints which slept arose, and came out of the graves after his resurrection, and went into the holy city, and appeared unto many.
Page 381 - Chambers, or of myself, gave the account which I now transmit to you in his own hand ; being willing that of so great a work the history should be known, and that each writer should receive his due proportion of praise from posterity. I recommend to you to preserve this scrap of literary intelligence in Mr. Swinton's own hand, or to deposit it in the Museum, that the veracity of this account may never be doubted. I am, Sir, Your most humble servant, Dec. 6, 1784. SAM : JOHNSON.
Page 82 - I am sure (said she) they have affected me" — " Why (said Johnson, smiling, and rolling himself about,) that is, because, dearest, you're a dunce." When she some time afterwards mentioned this to him, he said with equal truth and politeness ; " Madam, if I had thought so, I certainly should not have said it.
Page 277 - Forbearing one another, and forgiving one another, if any man have a quarrel against any: even as Christ forgave you, so also do ye. And above all these things put on charity, which is the bond of perfectness.
Page 70 - ... and myself. We found ourselves very elegantly entertained at her house in the Adelphi, where I have passed many a pleasing hour with him

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