The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, 1. köide

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Contains the proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, the Wernerian Natural History Society, etc

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Page 263 - The air was calm, and the sky unclouded. It was Holy Thursday, and a great part of the population was assembled in the churches. Nothing seemed to presage the calamities of the day. At seven minutes after four in the afternoon the first shock was felt ; it was sufficiently powerful, to make the bells of the churches toll...
Page 263 - ... diameter, left a mass of ruins scarcely exceeding five or six feet in elevation. The sinking of the ruins has been so considerable, that there BOW scarcely remain any vestiges of pillars or columns.
Page 250 - ... cavity of the capsule. The incisions are repeated every evening until each capsule has received six or eight wounds ; they are then allowed to ripen their seeds. The ripe capsules afford little or no juice.
Page 231 - The violet light wan obtained in the usual manner by means of a common prism, and was collected into a focus by a lens of a sufficient size. The...
Page 265 - Commissaries were appointed to burn the bodies; and, for this purpose, funeral piles were erected between the heaps of ruins. This ceremony lasted several days. Amid so many public calamities, the people devoted themselves to those religious duties which they thought were the most fitted to appease the wrath of Heaven. Some, assembling in procession, sung funeral hymns ; others in a state of distraction, confessed themselves aloud in the streets. In this town was now repeated what had been remarked...
Page 265 - It being impossible to inter so many thousand corpses, half buried under the ruins, commissaries were appointed to burn the bodies ; and for this purpose funeral piles were erected between the heaps of ruins. This ceremony lasted several days. Amid so many public calamities, the people devoted themselves to those religious duties which they thought most...
Page 76 - ... from the circumstance of each writer on the subject being influenced by a similar bias, the most gross and extravagant results are at length obtained. Thus authors, we find, of the first respectability in the present day, give a length of 80 to 100 feet, or upwards, to the Mysticetus, and remark, with unqualified assertion, that when the captures were less frequent, and the animals had sufficient time to attain their full growth, specimens were found of 150 to 200 feet in length, or even longer...
Page 265 - Caracas was then repeated what had been remarked in the province of Quito, after the tremendous earthquake of 1797 ; a number of marriages were contracted between persons who had neglected for many years to sanction their union by the sacerdotal benediction. Children found parents, by whom they had never till then been acknowledged; restitutions were promised by persons who had never been accused of fraud; and families who had long been at enmity were drawn together by the tie of common calamity.
Page 7 - Compounds," which bears date January 8, 1819, and which appeared in Brewster and Jamieson's Edinb. Phil. Journal, 1819, occur these words :— " One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantities in permanent solution
Page 181 - Linth) was begun on the 10th of May, and finished on the 13th. of June, under the direction of M. Venetz. The gallery was sixtyeight feet long, and during its formation the workmen were exposed to the constant risk of being crushed to pieces by the falling blocks of ice, or buried under the glacier itself...

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