The London Medical and Surgical Journal, 3. köide

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Page 327 - To give a stronger impulse and a more systematic direction to scientific inquiry, — to promote the intercourse of those who cultivate Science in different parts of the British Empire, with one another, and with foreign philosophers, — to obtain a more general attention to the objects of Science, and a removal of any disadvantages of a public kind which impede its progress.
Page 90 - The Principles and Practice of Obstetric Medicine ; in a Series of Systematic Dissertations on Midwifery, and on the Diseases of Women and Children.
Page 163 - ... appetites were good, but still they remained paralytics. At last, at some period of the disease, motion and sensation gradually returned, and a recovery generally took place, although, in some instances, the paralysis was very capricious, vanishing and again reappearing. The French pathologists, you may be sure, searched anxiously in the nervous centres for the cause of this strange disorder, but could find none ; there was no evident lesion, functional or organic, discoverable in the brain,...
Page 320 - My attention was directed to a spot about two inches below the knee, to which the pain was particularly referred. This part of the tibia was exposed by a crucial incision of the integuments. The periosteum now was not in the same state as at the time of the former operation. It was scarcely thicker than natural, and the bone beneath was hard and compact. A trephine of a middle size was applied, and a circle of bone was removed extending into the cancellous structure, but no abscess was discovered....
Page 206 - ... nape of the neck, or behind the ears, which should be kept open some weeks. After the chronic inflammation is subdued, the cataract is to be touched every morning with a solution of the potassa cum calce, beginning with a weak solution, and increasing it gradually. In the incipient stage of cataract I am convinced much good may be done, and a cure effected ; but when the disease is become confirmed, and the patient is old and feeble, there is little to be expected, and an operation had always...
Page 353 - As long as he can recollect, he had always lived in a hole, (a small, low apartment, which he sometimes calls a cage,) where he had always sat upon the ground, with bare feet, and clothed only with a shirt and a pair of breeches. In his apartment, he never heard a sound, whether produced by a man, by an animal, or by anything else.
Page 541 - During all this time the patient continued to converse quietly with the operator, and did not exhibit the slightest sign of sensibility. There was no motion of the limbs or of the features, no change in the respiration nor in the voice, no emotion even in the pulse. The patient continued in the same state of automatic indifference and impassibility in which she was some minutes before the operation.
Page 162 - I think it has never been sufficiently or satisfactorily examined, considering its importance in a practical point of view, and the new light which it may throw on many of the most obscure and perplexing forms of disease. I shall endeavour to prove, first, that paralysis (from whatsoever cause it may arise) affecting one portion of the circumferential extremities of the nerves, may also affect other portions of their extremities ; secondly, that pain originating in one situation may produce a similar...
Page 537 - In both these cases, the cause of the disease appeared to lie in the increased or rather deranged sensibility of the oesophagus itself. In wounds of the cervical portion of the spinal marrow, it occasionally occurs that the sensibility of the oesophagus is so increased, that deglutition is rendered impossible in consequence of pain, a fact sufficient to direct us to apply our therapeutic agents to the neck in such cases as I have related. In fever I have witnessed several times a very peculiar species...
Page 409 - The patient, a soldier, had been invalided for some complaint of his urinary organs, of which a stricture formed one. The removal of this did not much alleviate his symptoms, and on examination with the catheter, a smart blow was felt on the instrument with the termination of the flow of urine, giving rise to the idea of a stone. This always took place, and sometimes the stroke seemed to be repeated twice, or even three times, although each time fainter than before. The first blow would sometimes...

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