Social Reform in England

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Cassell, Petter, and Glapin, 1866 - 409 pages
 

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Page 155 - Majesty that it may be enacted, and be it enacted . . . that whereas by reason of some defects in the law poor people are not restrained from going from one parish to another, and therefore do endeavour to settle themselves in those parishes where there is the best stock, the largest commons or wastes to build cottages, and the most woods for them to burn and destroy...
Page 88 - February, 1863, a royal commission was appointed to inquire into the working of the Act relative to transportation and penal servitude.
Page 269 - ... the world's history can hardly be exaggerated. It was fitting that the little commonwealth, which was foremost among the nations in its hatred of tyranny, its love of maritime adventure, and its aptitude for foreign trade, should take the lead in the great commercial movements which characterized the close of the sixteenth and the commencement of the seventeenth centuries.
Page 35 - The name of reform in the criminal laws had not been heard in the House of Commons 'for fifty.eight years when in 1808, Romilly carried his bill for the abolition of the punishment of death for privately stealing from the person to the value of five shillings: in other words for picking pockets.
Page 128 - ... consequence of official station, little or no additional expenditure. Many persons who had filled office received more than their official salary as the reward for their services. Lord Grenville, for instance, had received other rewards besides the salary attached to the office, which he had filled with so much honour to himself, and so much advantage to the country. He mentioned this, for the purpose of...
Page 210 - The Guardians of any Union or any Parish wherein the Relief to the Poor is administered by a Board of Guardians may, if they deem proper, with Consent of the Poor Law Board, contract with the Managers of any Certified Industrial School for the Maintenance and Education of any Pauper Child.
Page 133 - And we have ordained : respecting those lordless men of whom no law can be got, that the kindred be commanded that they domicile him to folk-right, and find him a lord in the folk-mote; and if they then will not or cannot produce him at the term, then be he thenceforth a 'flyma,' and let him slay him for a thief who can come at him : and whoever after that shall harbour him, let him pay for him according to his 'wer,
Page 282 - Grattan may be regarded as the last of those celebrated parliamentary orators, who dignified the close of the eighteenth and the commencement of the nineteenth century. He...
Page 409 - The Piety of Daily Life. Illustrated in a Series of Tales and Sketches, chiefly designed for the Young. By Jane C. Simpson, Author of " Linda," " Woman's History," " April Hours,
Page 388 - He refused to contribute anything, and it was very much to the honour of his constituents that they brought him in gratuitously. But look to the state of our election practices, when such an outburst of popular feeling could not be given effect to without that enormous sacrifice of money.

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