Life and Reminiscences of General Wm. T. Sherman

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R. H. Woodward Company, 1891 - 479 pages
 

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Page 437 - Of guns, and drums, and wounds, (God save the mark !) And telling me, the sovereign'st thing on earth Was parmaceti for an inward bruise ; And that it was great pity, so it was, That villanous saltpetre should be digg'd Out of the bowels of the harmless earth, Which many a good tall fellow had destroy'd So cowardly ; and, but for these vile guns, He would himself have been a soldier.
Page 407 - Constitution of the Provisional Government of the Confederate States of America, ordained and established at Montgomery, Alabama, on the...
Page 343 - SOLDIER'S DREAM. Our bugles sang truce — for the night-cloud had lowered, And the sentinel stars set their watch in the sky ; And thousands had sunk on the ground overpowered, The weary to sleep and the wounded to die.
Page 419 - first in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen.
Page 17 - And furthermore, as president of the Board of Supervisors, I beg you to take immediate steps to relieve me as superintendent, the moment the State determines to secede, for on no earthly account will I do any act or think any thought hostile to or in defiance of the old Government of the United States.
Page 41 - Here lies the seat of the coming empire; and from the West, when our task is done, we will make short work of Charleston and Richmond, and the impoverished coast of the Atlantic.
Page 36 - I repeat, you do General McPherson and myself too much honor. At Belmont you manifested your traits, neither of us being near. At Donelson, also, you illustrated your whole character. I was not near, and General McPherson in too subordinate a capacity to influence you.
Page 54 - You will be invited to seek new adventures abroad; do not yield to the temptation, for it will lead only to death and disappointment. Your general now bids you farewell, with the full belief that, as in war you have been good soldiers, so in peace you will make good citizens; and if, unfortunately, new war should arise in our country, "Sherman's army...
Page 369 - You cannot qualify war in harsher terms than I will. War is cruelty, and you cannot refine it ; and those who brought war on our country deserve all the curses and maledictions a people can pour out.
Page 36 - McPherson, as the men to whom, above all others, I feel indebted for whatever I have had of success. How far your advice and suggestions have been of assistance, you know. How far your execution of whatever has been given you to do entitles you to the reward I am receiving, you cannot know as well as I do. I feel all the gratitude this letter would express, giving it the most flattering construction.

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