Puritans and Puritanism in Europe and America: A Comprehensive Encyclopedia, 1. köide

Front Cover
Francis J. Bremer, Tom Webster
ABC-CLIO, 2006 - 697 pages

This exhaustive treatment of the Puritan movement covers its doctrines, its people, its effects on politics and culture, and its enduring legacy in modern Britain and America.


Puritanism began in the 1530s as a reform movement within the Church of England. It endured into the 18th century. In between, it powerfully influenced the course of political events both in Britain and in the United States. Puritanism shaped the American colonies, particularly New England. It was a key ingredient in literature, from authors as diverse as John Milton and Nathaniel Hawthorne. Although Puritanism as a formal movement has been gone for more than 300 years, its influence continues on the mores and norms of America and Britain.

This ambitious work contains nearly 700 entries covering people, events, ideas, and doctrines--the whole of Puritanism. Exhaustive and authoritative, it draws on the work of more than 80 leading scholars in the field. Impeccable scholarship combines with eminent readability to make this a valuable work for all readers and researchers from secondary school up.


  • Nearly 700 entries cover the entire spectrum of Puritanism: people, places, events, doctrines, culture, and politics
  • More than 80 leading scholars provide authoritative information in readable, accessible form
  • Primary source documents, from essays by influential Puritan leaders to excerpts from diaries of everyday people, illuminate the concerns of Puritans in their own words
  • Numerous illustrations include portraits of Puritan figures, photographs of historic sites, and images of historical events
  • A glossary gives quick reference for such unfamiliar terms as antinomianism, conventicles, familist, and Socinian

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Contents

Ideas Events and Issues
293
Glossary
587
Primary Sources
595
Bibliography
655
Index
669
About the Editors
697
Copyright

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Page 650 - The Offering of Christ once made is that perfect redemption, propitiation, and satisfaction, for all the sins of the whole world, both original and actual; and there is none other satisfaction for sin, but that alone. Wherefore the sacrifices of Masses, in the which it was commonly said, that the Priest did offer Christ for the quick and the dead, to have remission of pain or guilt, were blasphemous fables, and dangerous deceits.
Page 650 - The supper of the Lord is not only a sign of the love that Christians ought to have among themselves one to another; but rather it is a sacrament of our redemption by Christ's death: insomuch that to such as rightly, worthily, and with faith, receive the same, the bread which we break is a partaking of the body of Christ; and likewise the cup of blessing is a partaking of the blood of Christ.
Page 597 - And as for our good people's lawful recreation, our pleasure likewise is, that after the end of divine service our good people be not disturbed, letted or discouraged from any lawful recreation, such as dancing, either men or women, archery for men, leaping, vaulting, or any other such harmless recreation, nor from having of May games, Whitsun ales, and morris dances, and the setting up of maypoles and other sports therewith used: so as the same be had in due and convenient time, without impediment...
Page 650 - SACRAMENTS ordained of Christ be not only badges or tokens of Christian men's profession, but rather they be certain sure witnesses, and effectual signs of grace, and God's good will towards us, by the which he doth work invisibly in us, and doth not only quicken, but also strengthen and confirm our Faith in him.
Page 651 - Christian Religion doth not prohibit, but that a man may swear when the Magistrate requireth, in a cause of faith and charity, so it be done according to the Prophet's teaching, in justice, judgment, and truth.

About the author (2006)

Francis J. Bremer, Ph.D., is chair of the Department of History at Millersville University of Pennsylvania, Millersville, PA, and editor of the Winthrop Papers for the Massachusetts Historical Society. His published works include numerous studies of Puritanism, including The Puritan Experiment: New England Society from Bradford to Edwards and John Winthrop: America's Forgotten Founding Father.

Tom Webster, Ph.D., is lecturer in British history at the University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland. His published works include Godly Clergy in Early Stuart England and The Diary of Samuel Rogers, 1634-38.

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