Journal of a Third Voyage for the Discovery of a Northwest Passage, from the Atlantic to the Pacific: Performed in the Years 1824-25, in His Majesty's Ships Hecla and Fury, Under the Orders of Captain William E. Parry ...

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H. C. Carey and I. Lee, 1826 - 232 pages
 

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Page 77 - I concluded, what, indeed, had long been a matter of probable conjecture, that Barrow's Strait was not permanently frozen during the winter. From the tops of the hills about Cape York, beyond which promontory Lieutenant Ross travelled, no appearance of ice could be distinguished...
Page 221 - Baffin's Bay, and by the fossil wood of Melville Island, Cape York, and Byam Martin Island. 6. That the boulders or rolled blocks met with in different quarters, and in tracts distant from their original localities, afford evidence of the passage of water across them, and at a period subsequent to the deposition of the newest solid strata, namely, those of the tertiary class. 7. That nowhere are there...
Page 61 - While Lieutenants Sherer and Ross, and myself, were admiring the extreme beauty of this phenomenon from the observatory, we all simultaneously uttered an exclamation of surprise at seeing a bright ray of the Aurora shoot suddenly downward from the general mass of light, and between us and the land, which was then distant only three thousand yards.
Page 144 - ... that there must exist in the polar regions some general motion of the sea towards the west, causing the ice to set in that direction, when not impelled by contrary winds, or local and occasional Currents, until it butts against thos'e shores which are actually found to be most encumbered by it ;' and he offers a suggestion for the consideration of others, ' whether such a tendency of the sea may not have some connection with the motion of the earth on its axis?
Page 61 - February, the aurora again appeared over the hills in a south direction, presenting a brilliant mass of light, very similar to that just described. The rolling motion of the light laterally was here also very striking, as well as the increase of its intensity thus occasioned. The light occupied horizontally about a point of the compass, and extended in height scarcely a degree above the land, which seemed, however, to conceal from us a part of the phenomenon. It was always evident enough that the...
Page 142 - I have to acquaint you, for the information of their Lordships, that the expedition, the main object of which is to solve, if possible, the question of a north-west passage from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean, particularly by Prince Regent's Inlet, and which sailed from England in May, 1829...
Page 119 - Every endeavour of ours to get her off, or if got off, to float her to any known place of safety, would be at once utterly hopeless in itself, and productive of extreme risk to our remaining ship.
Page 222 - That the islands and lands described in tjie sketch exhibit the same general geognostical arrangements as occur in all other extensive tracts of country hitherto examined by the naturalist, — a fact...
Page 56 - never had an invention a more complete and satisfactory triumph ; for to the last moment of our operations at sea did the compass indicate the true magnetic direction.
Page 148 - Persevering in difficulty, unappalled by danger, and patient under distress, they scarcely ever use the language of complaint, much less that of despair ; and sometimes, when all human hope seems at its lowest ebb, they furnish the most beautiful examples of that firm reliance on a merciful and superintending Providence, which is the only rational source of true fortitude in man. Often, with their narratives impressed upon my mind, and surrounded by the very difficulties which they in their frail...

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