The Retrospective Review, 1–2. köide

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J. R. Smith, 1853
Consisting of criticisms upon, analyses of, and extracts from curious, valuable, and scarce old books.

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Page 92 - ... before you were abused with divers stolen and surreptitious copies, maimed and deformed by the frauds and stealths of injurious impostors that exposed them, even those are now offered to your view cured and perfect of their limbs, and all the rest absolute in their numbers as he conceived them...
Page 91 - ... ordain'd otherwise, and he by death departed from that right, we pray you do not envie his friends the office of their care and paine...
Page 385 - The glories of our blood and state Are shadows, not substantial things ; There is no armour against fate ; Death lays his icy hand on kings : Sceptre and crown Must tumble down, And in the dust be equal made With the poor crooked scythe and spade.
Page 344 - Newcastle,' wrote by his wife, which shows her to be a mad, conceited, ridiculous woman, and he an asse to suffer her to write what she writes to him, and of him.
Page 161 - Ye'll ne'er get back to your ain countrie." 0 they rade on, and farther on, And they waded through rivers aboon the knee, And they saw neither sun nor moon, But they heard the roaring of the sea. It was mirk mirk night, and there was пае stern light, And they waded through red blude to the knee, For a' the blude that's shed on earth Hins through the springs o
Page 48 - Lero, lero, lilliburlero," that made an impression on the [King's] army, that cannot be imagined by those that saw it not. The whole army, and at last the people, both in city and country, were singing it perpetually. And perhaps never had so slight a thing so great an effect.
Page 118 - Son William, I am weary of the world. I would not live over my days again, if I could command them with a wish ; for the snares of life are greater than the fears of death.
Page 230 - MY good blade carves the casques of men, My tough lance thrusteth sure, My strength is as the strength of ten, Because my heart is pure. The shattering trumpet shrilleth high. The hard brands shiver on the steel, The...
Page 70 - English would wake, we might kill them all sleeping, I removed out of the way all the Guns and Hatchets : but my heart failing me, I put all things where they were again. The next day when we were to be burnt, our Master and some others spake for us, and the Evil was prevented in this place : And hereabouts we lay three Weeks together.
Page 206 - Non in solo pane vivit homo, sed in omni verbo, quod procedit de ore Dei.

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