Report

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Contents

Report of the Committee consisting of Mr G H DARWIN Professor
93
Second Report of the Committee consisting of Captain ABNEY Professor
126
Report of the Committee consisting of Mr JAMES HEYWOOD F R S
148
Report of the Committee consisting of Dr J H GLADSTONE Dr W R
155
Second Report of the Committee consisting of Professor P M DUNCAN F R S
161
Report of the Committee consisting of Dr M FOSTER the late Professor
177
Report of the Committee consisting of Mr J A HARVIE Brown Mr JOHN
189
Report of the Committee consisting of Mr SCLATER Mr HoWARD SAUNDERS
197
Ninth Report of the Committee consisting of Professor PRESTWICH Professor
204
Second Report of the Committee consisting of Professor A LEITH ADAMS
218
Report of the Anthropometric Committee consisting of Mr F GALTON
225
Report of a Committee consisting of JAMES GLAISHER F R S F R A S
290
Report of the Committee consisting of Professor CAYLEY F R S Professor
303
Seventh Report of the Committee consisting of Professor E HULL the
309
Report of the Committee consisting of Professor DEWAR Dr WILLIAMSON
317
Interim Report of the Committee for constructing and issuing practical
423
On some New Theorems on Curves of double Curvature By Professor STURM
440
On the Arrestation of Infusorial Life by Solar Light By Professor JOHN
450
On Magnetic Disturbances and Earthcurrents By Professor WILLIAM
463
On some applications of Electric Energy to Horticultural and Agricultural
474
On the Pressure of Wind upon a Fixed Plane Surface By Thomas Hawks
480
On some of the Developments of Mechanical Engineering during the last
494
SECTION A MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCE
513
On the Photographic Spectrum of Comet b 1881 By WILLIAM
520
On some applications of Electric Energy to Horticultural and Agricul
524
On the Application of Electricity to the Localisation of a Bullet in
531
On the arrangement of Cometic Perihelia with reference to the Suns
532
On the Equation of the Multiplier in the Theory of Elliptic Transforma
538
On Experiments with Manures on the Barley Crop of 1881 By
602
Address by ANDREW CROMBIE RAMSAY LL D F R S F G S President
609
On the Bridlington and Dimlington Glacial Shellbeds By G
616
A preliminary account of the working of Dowkerbottom Cave in Craven
622
Notes on Astromyelon and its root By JAMES SPENCER
628
On Flots By J R DAKYNS M A Geological Survey of England
634
The Gold Fields and the Quartzoutcrops of Southern India
639
On the Exploration of a Fissure in the Mountain Limestone at Raygill
645
BIOLOGY
651
Address by RICHARD OWEN C B M D D C L LL D F R S F L S
661
On the Constancy of Insects in their Visits to Flowers By ALFRED
667
On the Affinities of Proneomenia By Dr A A W HTBRECHT
673
DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY
682
On the Numeral and Philological relations of the Hebrew Phoenician
698
On a remarkable Human Skull found near York By EDWARD ALLEN
704
On the Double Iodide of Mercury and Copper By Professor SILVANUS
716
On the Homology of the Conariohypophysial Tract or of the socalled
719
On the Structure and Homologies of the Suspensory Ligament of
726
The Equipment of Exploring Expeditions Now and Fifty Years
738
On the Commercial Importance of Hudsons Bay with Remarks on recent
745
On the Island of Socotra By Professor BAYLEY BALFOUR M D
746
FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 2
752
Results to be attained by applying to the Transfer of Land in this Country
760
TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 6
762
Observations on the Improvements of the Mississippi River and on the pro
774
Report of the Committee on Patent Legislation
779
On the Velocity Function of a Liquid due to the Motion of Cylinders
5

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Page xxv - To give a stronger impulse and a more systematic direction to scientific inquiry, — to promote the intercourse of those who cultivate Science in different parts of the British Empire, with one another, and with foreign philosophers, — to obtain a more general attention to the objects of Science, and a removal of any disadvantages of a public kind which impede its progress.
Page xxvii - Committee two years in advance ; and the arrangements for it shall be entrusted to the Officers of the Association. General Committee. The General Committee shall sit during the week of the Meeting, or longer, to transact the business of the Association. It shall consist of the following persons : — CLASS A.
Page 33 - ... for which there are no words in language, and no ideas in the mind, — things which can only be conceived while they are visible, — the intense hollow blue of the upper sky melting through it all, — showing here deep, and pure, and lightless, there, modulated by the filmy, formless body of the transparent vapor, till it is lost imperceptibly in its crimson and gold.
Page xxix - Journal, the list of papers which have been read on that day, to add to it a list of those appointed to be read on the next day, and to send this copy of the Journal as early in the day as possible to the Printer, who is charged with printing the same before 8 AM next morning in the Journal.
Page 746 - But with this warning, and with the limitation that inquiries should be restricted to facts relating to communities of men which are capable of being expressed by numbers, and which gave promise when sufficiently multiplied to indicate general laws...
Page xxix - Committee (vide p. xxvii), and will receive, on application to the Treasurer in the Reception Room, Tickets entitling them to attend its Meetings. The Committees will take into consideration any suggestions which may be offered by their Members for the advancement of Science. They are specially requested to review the recommendations adopted at preceding...
Page 31 - ... gaseous or stellar, planetary, ring-formed, elliptical, and spiral, exist within the limits of the sidereal system ; and lastly, the whole system is alive with movements, the laws of which may one day be recognised, though at present they are too complex to be understood.
Page 503 - Association may to-day contemplate with regret even the mere distant prospect of the steam-engine becoming a thing of the past, I very much doubt whether those who meet here fifty years hence will then speak of that motor except in the character of a curiosity to be found in a museum.
Page 1 - Indeed, it would have been a matter of much regret to all of us, if we had not been able on this, our fiftieth anniversary, to hold our meeting in our mother city. My Lord Mayor, before going further, I must express my regret, especially when I call to mind the illustrious men who have preceded me in this chair, that it has not fallen to one of my eminent friends around tne, to preside on this auspicious occasion.
Page 727 - We can thus understand the concentration of related species within the same areas ; and how it is that under different latitudes, for instance in South America, the inhabitants of the plains and mountains, of the forests, marshes, and deserts, are...

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