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THE

ETHNOLOGICAL JOURNAL:

A MONTHLY RECORD OF

Ethnological Research and Criticism.

No. I.-JULY, 1865.

LONDON:
TRÜBNER & CO., 60, PATERNOSTER ROW;

LEIPSIC: F. A. BROCKHAUS.

Price One Shilling.

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JOURNAL OF PREHISTORIO AROHÆOLOGY AND ETHNOLOGY
LONDON : Published every Saturday by KENT & Co., and TRÜBNER & Co.,

Paternoster Row; and Ed. ŠTANFORD, Charing Cross.

organization of the young may be of the highest importance in their education
and destination. DR. DONOVAN has had long experience in this most valuable

science, and may be consulted at the London School of Phrenology, 111, Strand,

nearly opposite Exeter Hall.

5-26.27 9 noso

THE

ETHNOLOGICAL JOURNAL.

JULY, 1865.

ETHNOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY:

ARE TILEY DISTINCT SCIENCES, OR ONE AND THE SAME SCIENCE UNDER

DIFFERENT NAMES ? I. INTRODUCTORY ADDRESS ON THE STUDY OF ANTHROPOLOGY. Delivered

before the Anthropological Society of London, February 24th, 1863, by JAMES HUNT, Ph.D., F.S.A., F.R.S.L., Foreign Associate of the

Anthropological Society of Paris ; President. II. ANNIVERSARY ADDRESS. Delivered before the Anthropological Society of

London, January 5th, 1864, by JAMES HUNT, Ph.D., &c., &c.; President. III. ANNIVERSARY ADDRESS, &c., &c. Delivered January 3rd, 1865, by JAMES

HUNT, Ph.D., &c., &c.; President. IV. REVIEW OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF

PARIS. By M. PAUL BROCA, Secretary-General, Honorary Fellow of

the Anthropological Society of London. Delivered June 4th, 1863." Had the question with which we head this article been proposed for discussion some five or six years ago, the reader would have supposed, as many doubtless will even now suppose, that the object of the argument was to settle some nicety of definition, or to discuss some suggestion relative to a future distribution of scientific labour; but had any well-informed student of the science of man been asked at that time whether there was any serious distinction between the aims and labours of anthropologists and those of ethnologists, the answer would most decidedly have been, None whatever : the aims are so identical, the labours so alike, and the names so much an accident, that had the two words been turned out of the wheel of a lottery, and distributed to the several writers at perfect random, every one would have been sure of receiving an appropriate designation. In fact, many have used both names indifferently, and it has mainly depended on the country of the writer whether he adopted the one or the other. The Germans

From the “Anthropological Review,” No. 2, August, 1863.

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