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conceive; nor where the critics are to come from who are both competent and willing to sit in judgment on the labours of their brethren, and make merry with their errors in a work of professed buffoonery. No doubt there is folly enough in the world in all directions, but we are not aware that wit and humour are equally abundant or that a sufficient supply of them may be looked for in the very quarters where they are least in character. With the entire range of society to draw upon, Punch has stood for years without a single competitor of its own rank, and, though supported by professed wits and humorists, is not always able to come up to the mark.

But the present work is clearly not to be one in which, under a veil of pleasant and harmless humour, important truths are to be enforced or scientific follies smiled away. Even in its prospectus it holds out a threat which shows that its aim is not simply to laugh at follies as they may arise, but that it has already marked out specific individuals who are to be presented in an aspect little expected by themselves. Language of this kind clearly bodes a scientific Satirist, not a scientific Punch ; and a scientific Satirist will not be long in purchasing its experience.

To suppose that men really entitled to criticise will lend themselves to a project like this is utterly ridiculous. It is one thing to indulge in incidental playfulness; there may, too, be occasions in which even caustic wit becomes appropriate; but all this is something widely different from entering an arena of habitual buffoonery, an arena in which the very brightest names in science may constantly be at the mercy of juvenile impertinence and incompetence.

Public rumour points to this work as another of the strange projects set on foot by leading members of the Anthropological Society, and meant to forward the objects of the Society ; but surely no scientific body in this country would stoop so low as to give any countenance, direct or indirect, to a project of this kind. If, with a long list of members, with a Quarterly Revier, a Quarterly Journal of Proceedings, and the other facilities offered by its various publications--if, with all these resources, the Anthropological Society cannot maintain its position without the aid of a work in which its opponents may be anonymously lashed from month to month without itself incurring responsibility, then we say that the Anthropological Society must be a poor thing indeed, with all its pretensions. We trust its officers will be able indignantly to repudiate the charge which rumour has, in this case, brought against the Society, and we are much surprised that this has not been done already.

Editorial Communications, Books for Review, fc., are to be addressed to the Editor, care of Messrs. TRÜBNER & Co., 60, Paternoster Row, London; or, F. A. BROCKHAUS, Leipsic.

ETHNOLOGICAL JOURNAL:

A MONTHLY RECORD OF

Ethnological Research and Criticism.

The high interest which the Science of Man hias of late assumed, the many important questions involved in it, and the constantly incrcasing number of its students and cultivators, demand more facilities for the communication of facts and the discussion of opinions than our existing periodical literature affords; and it is in view of this demand that the present work is offered to the notice of the Public.

THE ETHNOLOGICAL JOURNAL will be conducted on the broadest and most liberal basis-not seeking to reflect any particular class of opinions, but open to all communications of merit directly bearing on its subject. Embracing in its sphere the entire Science of Man, in the most com. prehensive import of the term, no department of research will be deemed foreign to its scope which tends to throw light on the nature, origin, or history of humanity, on its place in the scale of being, or its relations to the inferior forms of life. In fact, all the great questions of the science will be fully and carefully discussed, and always, we trust, with the combined independence and moderation which should ever characterize the pursuit of truth.

Criticism will, of course, constitute an important feature in such a work. The various theories of leading writers will be carefully and candidly examined; and, as far as may be practicable, all new publications of importance will be briefly noticed or formally reviewed. Neither will it be content with simply collecting materials and discussing opinions: it will also keep prominently in view the higher aims of every true science—the organisation of facts, and the evolution and application of principles ; for these alone can give meaning to phenomena, or utility to knowledge.

Among other details of current intelligence, THE ETHNOLOGICAL, JOURNAL will regularly publish the Official Reports of the Proceedings and Discussions of the Ethnological Society of London; and we may add that the promises of literary co-operation already received from distinguished writers leave us no room for doubting that this work will crc long be entitled to claim a high and useful place in the literaturo of our science.

THE ETHNOLOGICAL JOURNAL is published on the 1st of every month, Price ONE SHILLING, and sent post free to Annual Subscribers in

Great Britain and the Colonies.

Editorial Communications, Books for Review, &c., are to be addressed to the Eaitor, care of Messrs. TrÜBNER & Co., 60, Paternoster Row,

London ; or, F. A. BROCKHAUS, Leipzig.

THE ETHNOLOGICAL

JOURNAL:

A MONTHLY RECORD OF
Ethnological Research and Criticism.

AND

- ARE

THEY

Contents of No. I.-July 1865. I. ETHNOLOGY ANTHROPOLOGY –

DISTINCT SCIENCES ? II. LUBBOCK ON THE UNITY OF MAN AND NATURAL SELECTION. III. REMARKS ON THE INADEQUACY OF MERELY ANATOMICAL

DESCRIPTIONS OF THE HUMAN CRANIUM IN THE STUDY OF

ETHNOLOGY. By THOMAS SYMES PRIDEAUX, Esq. IV. ON THE PLACE OF MAN IN THE ANIMATE SCALE. By LUKE

BURKE, Esq.
V. NOTES ON THE South SLAVONIC COUNTRIES IN AUSTRIA AND

TURKEY IN EUROPE.
VI. THE ETHNOLOGICAL JOURNAL.
VII. PROCEEDINGS

ETHNOLOGICAL SOCIETY; RECENT
CONTRIBUTIONS TO ETHNOLOGY, &c.

OF

THE

Contents of No. II.-August 1865.
I. THE PLACE OF MAN IN THE ANIMATE SCALE. No. 2. By

LUKE BURKE, Esq.
II. PIIRENOLOGY-WHAT IS IT? By ETHNICUS.
III. SIR JOHN LUBBOCK ON PRE-HISTORIC TIMES.
IV. ANTHROPOLOGY AND THE BRITISH ASSOCIATION.
V. PROCEEDINGS OF THE ETHNOLOGICAL SOCIETY.

1. Captain WILSON on "The Indian Tribes inhabiting the Vicinity of the 49th Parallel of North Latitude."

2. Dr. Donovan on "Craniology and Phrenology in relation to Ethnology."

3. Professor BELL on Visible Speech.”

Contents of No. III.-September 1865. I. THE PLACE OF MAN IN THE ANIMATE SCALE. No. 3. II. LANGUAGE AS A TEST OF THE RACES OF MAN. III. ON THE TERMS CAUCASIAN, ARYAN, AND TURANIAN, IN

ETHNOLOGY. IV. ON THE REPRESENTATIVE AFFINITIES OF THE EUROPEAN AND

ASIATIC RACES. V. MEETING OF A DEPUTATION FROM THE COMITÉ D'ARCHÉOLOGIE

AMÉRICAINE DE FRANCE. VI. THE ANTRHOPOLOGICAL CONGRESS. VII. CORRESPONDENCE -ANTHROPOLOGY AND THE BRITISH Asso

CIATION VIII. THE ETHNOLOGICAL JOURNAL :-ETHNOLOGY AND ANTHRO.

POLOGY.

İ. ON THE ORIGIN OF THE HUNGARIANS. BY M. VÁMBÉRY. II. MAN, SAVAGE AND CIVILIZED-AN APPEAL TO Facts. III. ETHNOGRAPHY, ETHNOLOGY, AND ANTHROPOLOGY. IV. THE BRITISH ASSOCIATION-ETHNOLOGICAL PROCEEDINGS.

1. Mr. CRAWFURD on The Physical and Mental Characteristics of the African or Occidental Negro.

2. Mr. Tylor on The Negro and European Dialects of Surinam and Curaçoa.

3. Mr. CRAWFURD on The History of Cannibalism.
4. Dr. CHARNOCK on European Cannibalism.

5. General Summary of the remaining Proceedings.
V. ANTHROPOLOGY AND THE BRITISH ASSOCIATION.
VI. ARCHÆOLOGY AND THE BRITISH ASSOCIATION.
VII. CORRESPONDENCE.
VIII. THE ETHNOLOGICAL JOURNAL.

TRÜBNER & CO., 60, PATERNOSTER ROW.

Two Vols., 8vo., price 328. DESCRIPTIVE ETHNOLOGY. By R. G. LATHAM, M.A., M.D., F.R.s., late Fellow of King's Coll., Cambridge, &c.

THE ETHNOLOGY OF INDIA. May be had separately, 8vo., 168.
THE ETHNOLOGY OF EUROPE. Fcap. 8vo., 58.
THE ETHNOLOGY OF THE BRITISH ISLANDS. Fcap. 8vo., 5s.
THE ETHNOLOGY OF THE BRITISH COLONIES AND DEPEN.

DENCIES. Fcap. 8vo., 5s.
MAN AND HIS MIGRATIONS. Fcap. 8vo., 58.
THE NATURAL HISTORY OF THE VARIETIES OF MAN. 8vo.,
Illustrated, 21s.

JOHN VAN VOORST, 1, Paternoster Row.

Price Twopence; in Monthly Parts, Tenpence

THE GEOLOGICAL & NATURAL HISTORY REPERTORY;

An Ellustrated Popular Weekly Magazine of GEOLOGY, PALÆONTOLOGY, MINERALOGY, AND ZOOLOGY,

AND

JOURNAL OF PREHISTORIO AROHÆOLOGY AND ETHNOLOGY. LONDON: Published every Saturday by KENT & Co., and TRÜBNER & Co.,

Paternoster Row; and ED. STANFORD, Charing Cross. DHRENOLOGY.-A truly skilful and candid analysis of the mental Just Published, crown 8vo, pp. 324, price 4s., cloth extra. ETHNOLOGY AND PHRENOLOGY AS AN AID

organization of the young may be of the highest importance in their education and destination. DR. DONOVAN has had long experience in this most valuable science, and may be consulted at the London School of Pbrenology, 111, Strand, nearly opposite Exeter Hall.

TO THE HISTORIAN.

By J. W. JACKSON, F. A. S. L. London: TRÜBNER & Co., 60, Paternoster Row. Edinb.: M‘LACHLAN & STEWART.

By the same Author.
ECSTATICS OF GENIUS. Price 1s. 6d.
MESMERISM IN CONNECTION WITH POPULAR SUPER-

STITIONS. 18.
LECTURES ON MESMERISM. ls.

London: BAILLIERE, 219, Regent Street. Edinb.: M‘LACHLAN & STEWART.

ALEXANDER STEWART, Curator, Phrenological

MUSEUM, 1, SURGEON SQUARE, EDINBURGH, respectfully intiinates that he supplies Casts illustrative of Phrenology and Ethnology, from National Crania, and from Casts, Busts, and Masks of various remarkable individuals. Single Copies, from 28. to 58. each.

MISCELLANEOUS CASTS of the Skull, Brain, Marked Bust, &c. &c. at various prices, including the Skull and Brain of the Male Gorilla, from the Collection of M. du Chaillu, price 10s. 6d. Copies of List sent on application.

Price Two Shillings and Sixpence,

VICTORIA TOTO CELO ; or, Modern Astro

nomy Recast. With a Review of the “ Astronomy of the Ancients.” By JAMES REDDIE, F.A.S.L., Hon. Mem. Dial. Soc., Edin. Univ.

* In this work, the theory of Solar Motion in space (propounded by Sir W. Herschel in 1783, and since accepted " by all astronomers who had examined the subject carefully,according to Professor Airy), was for the first time assailed ; and it was demonstrated that “either the sun's motion towards Her. cules must be stopped, or Kepler's laws and the Principia of Newton must be abandoned.” (Sect. 55.) This was in September, 1863.

PRACTICAL RESULT. The Council of the Royal Astronomical Society, in their Annual Report for 1863 (Monthly Notices, Feb. 1864, p. 104), state that “ strange as it may appear,in the opinion of Mr. Airy, "the whole question of solar motion in space appears to remain at this moment in doubt und abeyance. By the same Author, and uniform with “ Victoria Toto Cælo," Price

Five Shillings, with numerous Diagrams.

VIS INERTIÆ VICTA; or, Fallacies affecting

Science : an Essay towards increasing our knowledge of some physical laws, and a Review of certain mathematical principles of natural philosophy.

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