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Professor Bell, in a brief address, called attention to his discovery of a Universal Alphabet, by means of which may be expressed all the possible modifications of articulate sound; and, startling as the statement must seem, there can be no doubt that the method adopted works in the right direction for realizing the end in view, even if it should in any way fail to attain it.

The system is at present a secret ; for, as the nature of the case does not admit of any patent rights in such an invention, the discoverer wishes it to be taken up by the Government. The descriptions given are therefore purposely restricted; but, to make up for this, every kind of practical test is eagerly offered. On the present occasion various difficult words were repeated to Mr. Bell, who wrote them down, and then handed the writing to his sons, who in the meantime had left the room, to be out of hearing, and who were now recalled. They certainly pronounced them astonishingly well, all things considered; they did not always succeed at first in the more difficult cases, but, on being told of their failure, they reached the true sounds after one or two trials, and this purely from the written character.

In fact the discoverer seems to us to have attempted even more than is needed. What is wanted is simply to be able to express all the genuine sounds of a language. We do not see why an educated speaker must needs imitate all the additional harshnesses of a boor or a savage ; yet this seemed to us to be in the programme, and the feat really looks as if it were at all events theoretically possible--as if the system admitted of it, should any one be able to draw out all its powers.

The characters represent to the eye the positions of the organism in vocal utterance, and admit of being modified as these positions vary. The idea of the system is therefore thoroughly sound, and the question is simply a practical one. We learn, too, that the fundamental characters are only thirty-four in number, which is certainly as near an approach to simplicity as the nature of the case seems at all to permit. Altogether the matter evidently deserves careful consideration, and can scarcely fail of ultimately eventuating in success; and therefore it should, if possible, be made to succeed at once, so that the discoverer may have the satisfaction of witnessing the triumph of his long labours, as well as of receiving some material advantage from them.

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ETHNOLOGICAL JOURNAL:

A MONTHLY RECORD OF

Ethnological Research and Criticism.

The high interest which the Science of Man has of late assumed, the many important questions involved in it, and the constantly increasing number of its students and cultivators, demand more facilities for the communication of facts and the discussion of opinions than our existing periodical literature affords; and it is in view of this demand that the present work is offered to the notice of the Public. - THE ETHNOLOGICAL JOURNAL will be conducted on the broadest and most liberal basis-not seeking to reflect any particular class of opinions, but open to all communications of merit directly bearing on its subject. Embracing in its sphere the entire Science of Man, in the most comprehensive import of the term, no department of research will be deemed foreign to its scope which tends to throw light on the nature, origin, or history of humanity, on its place in the scale of being, or its relations to the inferior forms of life. In fact, all the great questions of the science will be fully and carefully discussed, and always, we trust, with the combined independence and moderation which should ever characterize the pursuit of truth.

Criticism will, of course, constitute an important feature in such a work. The various theories of leading writers will be carefully and candidly examined; and, as far as may be practicable, all new publications of importance will be briefly noticed or formally reviewed. Neither will it be content with simply collecting materials and discussing opinions : it will also keep prominently in view the higher aims of every true science-the organisation of facts, and the evolution and application of principles ; for these alone can give meaning to phenomena, or utility to knowledge.

Among other details of current intelligence, THE ETHNOLOGICAL JOURNAL will regularly publish the Official Reports of the Proceedings and Discussions of the Ethnological Society of London; and we may add that the promises of literary co-operation already received from distinguished writers leave us no room for doubting that this work will ere long be entitled to claim a high and useful place in the literature of our science.

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THE ETHNOLOGICAL

JOURNAL:

A MONTHLY RECORD OF

Ethnological Research and Criticism.

AND

Contents of No. I.—July 1865. 1. ETANOLOGY

ANTHROPOLOGY - ARE THEY DISTINCT SCIENCES ?

1. INTRODUCTORY ADDRESS ON THE STUDY OF ANTHROPOLOGY. Delivered before the Anthropological Society of London, February 24th, 1863, by JAMES HUNT, Ph.D., F.S.A., F.R.S.L., Foreign Associate of the Anthropological Society of Paris ; President.

2. ANNIVERSARY ADDRESS. Delivered before the Anthropological Society of London, January 5th, 1864, by JAMES HUNT, Ph.D., &c., &c.; President.

3. ANNIVERSARY ADDRESS, &c., &c. Delivered January 3rd, 1865, by JAMES HUNT, Ph.D., &c., &c.; President.

4. REVIEW OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF Paris. By M. PAUL BROCA, Secretary-General, Honorary Fellow

of the Anthropological Society of London. Delivered June 4th, 1863. II. LUBBOCK ON THE UNITY OF MAN AND NATURAL SELECTION. III. REMARKS ON THE INADEQUACY OF MERELY ANATOMICAL

DESCRIPTIONS OF THE HUMAN CRANIUM IN THE STUDY OF

ETHNOLOGY. By THOMAS SYMES PRIDEAUX, Esq. IV. ON THE PLACE OF MAN IN THE ANIMATE SCALE. By LUKE

BURKE, Esq. V. NOTES ON THE SOUTH SLAVONIC COUNTRIES IN AUSTRIA AND

TURKEY IN EUROPE. VI. THE ETHNOLOGICAL JOURNAL. VII. PROCEEDINGS THE ETHNOLOGICAL SOCIETY; RECENT

CONTRIBUTIONS TO ETHNOLOGY, &c.

OF

Contents of No. II.-August 1865.
I. THE PLACE OF MAN IN THE ANIMATE SCALE.

No. 2. By
LUKE BURKE, Esq.
II. PHRENOLOGY-WHAT IS IT? By ETHNICUS.
III. SIR JOHN LUBBOCK ON PRE-HISTORIC TIMES.
IV. ANTHROPOLOGY AND THE BRITISH ASSOCIATION.
V. PROCEEDINGS OF THE ETHNOLOGICAL SOCIETY.

1. Captain WILSON on “ The Indian Tribes inhabiting the Vicinity of the 49th Parallel of North Latitude.”

2. Dr. DONOVAN on “ Craniology and Phrenology in relation to Ethnology."

3. Professor BELL on “Visible Speech.”

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ANTHROPOLOGICAL REVIEW .

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supply a want which has long been felt by all who have directed any serious attention to the philosophy or natural history of Man. It will be a repository of facts, an arena for discussion, and a medium of communication between Anthropologists and travellers all over the world. All relevant subjects will receive in its pages a free and fair consideration, irrespective of party or personal feelings; and it will be the aim of the Editors to see that every question is discussed purely on its merits, and that every shade of opinion shall be able to command a fair and adequate representation.

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As a means of attaining these objects it will contain :1. Original Articles, or Translations of Original Communications

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THE ANTHROPOLOGICAL REVIEW,

AND

Journal of the Anthropological Society of London.

Contents of No. IX.-May 1865. 1. The Science of Religions. 2. The Plurality of the Human Race. 3. Zimmermann's l'Homme. 4. Mythologic Tales of South Africa, and of the Esquimaux in Greenland. 5. On the Thinking Substance in Man. By T. COLLINS SIMON. 6. Lacustrine Habitations and Primæval Antiquities. 7. Proceedings of the Anthropological Society of Paris. 8. Farewell Dinner to Captain Burton. 9. Correspondence. 10. Anthropological News. The Journal of the Anthropological Society of London contains:

REPORT OF COUNCIL (in continuation).
THE PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS.
ELECTION OF OFFICERS.
Sellos on Phallic Worship in India.
LUND and FAIRBANK on Syphilis in a Monkey.
GIBB on the Larynx of the Negro.
PEACOCK on a Skull exhumed at Pavenham.
MACKENZIE on Fetish Worship in Egypt.
SHORTt on the “ Leaf Wearers” of India.
VAMBÉRY on the Dervishes and Hadgis of Central Asia.

Contents of No. X.-July 1865. 1. Philosophy and Pseudo-Philosophy. 2. Diefenbach's Introduction to Ethnography and the History of

Civilization. 3. Bunsen on Biblical Ethnography, 4. Dutch Anthropology. 5. Man and the World. 6. On the Prospects of Anthropological Science at the British Association

of 1865.
7. Miscellanea Anthropologica.
The Journal of the Anthropological Society of London contains:-

Exhibition of two Peruvian Mummies,
PRITCHARD on the Inbabitants of Viti.
ANDERSON and BLAKE on Remains from Keiss.
WINWOOD READE on Missionaries among Savages.
BURNARD Owen on Missionary Successes.
THE BISHOP of Natal on Efforts of Missionaries.
SEEMANN on Western Eskimo Land.

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