The Works of Alexander Pope, Esq: In Nine Volumes Complete, with His Last Corrections, Additions, and Improvements, as They Were Delivered to the Editor a Little Before His Death, Together with the Commentary and Notes of Mr. Warburton, 7. köide

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A. Millar, J. and R. Tonson, C. Bathurst, R. Baldwin, W. Johnston, J. Richardson, B. Law, S. Crowder, T. Longman, T. Field, and T. Caslon, 1760
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Page 252 - ... not very common to young men, that the attractions of the world have not dazzled me very much ; and I...
Page 339 - Lucretius to publish against Tonson's ; agreeing to pay the author so many shillings at his producing so many lines. He made a great progress in a very short time, and I gave it to the corrector to compare with the Latin; but he went directly to Creech's translation, and found it the same word for word, all but the first page. Now, what d'ye think I did ? I arrested the translator for a cheat ; nay, and I stopped the corrector's pay too, upon this proof that he had made use of Creech instead of the...
Page 337 - As Mr. Lintot was talking, I observed he sat uneasy on his saddle, for which I expressed some solicitude : Nothing, says he, I can bear it well enough ; but since we have the day before us, methinks it would be very pleasant for you to rest awhile under the woods.
Page 294 - ... me to live agreeably in the town, or contentedly in the country, which is really all the difference I set between an easy fortune and a small one.
Page 95 - HAPPY the man whose wish and care A few paternal acres bound, Content to breathe his native air, In his own ground ; Whose herds with milk, whose fields with bread, Whose flocks supply him with attire ; Whose trees in Summer yield him shade, In Winter fire.
Page 327 - The inhabitants of this delicious isle, as they are without riches and honours, so are they without the vices and follies that attend them ; and were they but as much strangers to revenge, as they are to avarice and ambition, they might in fact answer the poetical notions of ,the golden age.
Page 252 - ... an advantage not very common to young men, that the attractions of the world have not dazzled me very much...
Page 100 - Histories are more full of examples of the fidelity of dogs than of friends...
Page 255 - ... included of his belief in its immortality. The diminutive epithets of vagula, blandula...
Page 338 - I have known one of them take down a Greek book upon my counter, and cry, Ah, this is Hebrew, I must read it from the latter end.

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