Commentaries on Colonial and Foreign Laws: Generally, and in Their Conflict with Each Other, and with the Law of England, 1. köide

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Saunders and Benning, 1838

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Page xxxii - But this must be understood with very many and very great restrictions. Such colonists carry with them only so much of the English law as is applicable to their own situation and the condition of an infant colony ; such for instance as the general rules of inheritance and of protection from personal injuries.
Page 730 - The children of persons who have been duly naturalized under any law of the United States, or who, previous to the passing of any law on that subject, by the Government of the United States...
Page 705 - For it is a principle of universal law, that the natural-born subject of one prince cannot by any act of his own, no, not by swearing allegiance to another, put off or discharge his natural allegiance to the former : for this natural allegiance was intrinsic, and primitive, and antecedent to the other; and cannot be devested without the concurrent act of that prince to whom it was first due.
Page 553 - ... upon any contract or sale of lands, tenements or hereditaments, or any interest in or concerning them...
Page 729 - ... declare, on oath, and prove to the satisfaction of the court, that for two years next preceding it has been his bona fide intention to become a citizen of the United States; and he shall, in all other respects, comply with the laws in regard to naturalization.
Page xxxi - That if there be a new and uninhabited country found out by English subjects, as the law is the birthright of every subject, so, wherever they go, they carry their laws with them, and therefore such new found country is to be governed by the laws of England...
Page lxv - Majesty's Court of King's Bench at Westminster; and that every Person disobeying any such Writ so to be issued by the said President shall be considered as in Contempt of the said Judicial Committee, and shall also be liable to such and the same Penalties and Consequences as if such Writ had issued out of the said Court of King's Bench, and may be sued for such Penalties in the said Court.
Page 203 - By marriage, the husband and wife are one person in law: that is, the very being or legal existence of the woman is suspended during the marriage, or at least incorporated and consolidated into that of the husband...
Page 461 - And these are called real chattels, as being interests issuing out of, or annexed to, real estates ; of which they have one quality, viz. immobility, which denominates them real ; but want the other, viz. a sufficient, legal, indeterminate duration ; and this want it is, that constitutes them chattels.
Page 510 - ... be executed by her in the character of protector for the sole purpose of giving her consent to the disposition of a tenant in tail, shall, upon her executing the same, or afterwards, be produced and acknowledged by her as her act and deed before a judge of one of the superior Courts at Westminster, or a master in chancery, or before two of the perpetual commissioners, or two special commissioners, to be respectively appointed as hereinafter provided.

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