The constitution of England, with life and notes by J. Macgregor

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Page 202 - Sense taken for a malicious Defamation, expressed either in Printing or Writing, and tending either to blacken the Memory of one who is dead, or the Reputation of one who is alive, and to expose him to public Hatred, Contempt or Ridicule.
Page 76 - Will you to the utmost of your " power maintain the laws of God, the true profession of the " gospel, and the protestant reformed religion established " by the law ? And will you preserve unto the bishops and " clergy of this realm, and to the churches committed to " their charge, all such rights and privileges as by law do " or shall appertain unto them, or any of them ? — King " or queen. All this I promise to do.
Page 355 - That the freedom of speech, and debates or proceedings in Parliament, ought not to be impeached or questioned in any court or place out of Parliament.
Page 353 - It hath sovereign and uncontrollable authority in the making, confirming, enlarging, restraining, abrogating, repealing, reviving, and expounding of laws, concerning matters of all possible denominations, ecclesiastical, or temporal, civil, military, maritime, or criminal ; this being the place where that absolute despotic power, which must in all governments reside somewhere, is intrusted by the constitution of these kingdoms.
Page 25 - Elements of Christian Theology ; containing Proofs of the Authenticity and Inspiration of the Holy Scriptures; a Summary of the History of the Jews; an Account of the Jewish Sects ; and a brief Statement of the Contents of the several Books of the Old Testament.
Page 352 - The power and jurisdiction of parliament, says Sir Edward Coke, is so transcendent and absolute that it cannot be confined. either for causes or persons, within any bounds.
Page 76 - The things which I have here before promised I will perform and keep : so help me God :" and then shall kiss the book (12).
Page 21 - Opera), the best farce (the Critic — it is only too good for a farce), and the best Address (Monologue on Garrick), and, to crown all, delivered the very best Oration (the famous Begum Speech) ever conceived or heard in this country.
Page 356 - The liberty of the press is indeed essential to the nature of a free state ; but this consists in laying no previous restraints upon publications, and not in freedom from censure for criminal matter, when published. Every freeman has an undoubted right to lay what sentiments he pleases before the public ; to forbid this is to destroy the freedom of the press ; but if he publishes what is improper, mischievous, or illegal, he must take the consequence of his own temerity.
Page 17 - The Political Consequences of the Reformation. II. The Rise, Progress, and Practical Influence of Political Theories. III. The Rise and Growth of the Continental Interests of Great Britain. In 1 vol.

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