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8. I sue, and sue in vain; it is most just: When women sue, they sue to be denied.

9. Fee-simple and a simple fee, And all the fees in tail,

Are nothing when compar'd to thee,
Thou best of fees-fe-male.

10. Heaven has no rage like love to hatred turn'd, And hell no fury like a woman scorn'd.

CONGREVE'S Mourning Bride. 11. O woman, lovely woman! Nature made thee To temper man; we had been brutes without thee! OTWAY'S Venice Preserved. 12. O woman! dear woman! whose form and whose soul Are the light and the life of each spell we pursue, Whether sunn'd in the tropics, or chill'd at the pole, If woman be there, there is happiness too!

13. Oh, say not woman's false as fair,
That, like the bee, she ranges,
Still seeking flowers more sweet and fair,
As fickle fancy changes.

Ah, no! the love, that first can warm,
Will leave her bosom never;

YOUNG.

No second passion e'er can charm
She loves, and loves for ever.

MOORE.

Роcоск.

14. Woman! blest partner of our joys and woes!
Even in the darkest hour of earthly ill,
Untarnish'd yet thy fond affection glows,

Throbs with each pulse, and beats with every thrill!
When sorrow rends the heart, when feverish pain

Wrings the hot drops of anguish from the brow,
To soothe the soul, to cool the burning brain,

Oh! who so welcome and so prompt as thou?

YAMOYDEN.

15. The lords of creation men we call,

16.

And they think they rule the whole;
But they're much mistaken, after all,
For they're under woman's control.

Woman's love,
Its fondness wide as the limitless wave,
And chainless by aught but the silent grave,
With devotion as humble as that which brings
To his idols the Indian's offerings,

Yet proud as that which the priestess feels,

When she nurses the flame of the shrine where she kneels.
MRS. E. C. EMBURY.

17. I would as soon attempt to entice a star
To perch upon my finger; or the wind
To follow me like a dog- as think to keep
A woman's heart again.

BAILEY'S Festus.

18. Away, away—you're all the same,
A fluttering, smiling, jilting throng!
Oh! by my soul, I burn with shame,
To think I've been your slave so long!

19. Oh! woman wrong'd can cherish hate
More deep and dark than manhood may,
But when the mockery of fate

Hath left revenge its chosen way,
Still lingers something of the spell

Which bound her to the traitor's bosom,
Still, 'mid the vengeful fires of hell,

Some flowers of old affection blossom.
20. Oh woman! subtle, lovely, faithless sex!
Born to enchant, thou studiest to perplex;
Ador'd as queen, thou play'st the tyrant's part,
And, taught to govern, would'st enslave the heart!

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MOORE.

J. G. WHITTIER.

R. T. PAINE.

504

WONDER-WORDS.

21. The man, who sets his heart upon a woman, Is a chameleon, and doth feed on air:

1.

From air he takes his colours, holds his life -
Changes with every wind-grows lean or fat
Rosy with hope, or green with jealousy,
Or pallid with despair - just as the gale
Varies from north to south-from heat to cold!
BULWER'S Lady of Lyons.

22. "Tis woman's smiles that lull our cares to rest,
Dear woman's charms, that give to life its zest;
"T is woman's hand that smoothes affliction's bed,
Wipes the cold sweat, and stays the sinking head!

WONDER.

They spake not a word,

But, like dumb statues, or breathless stones,
Star'd on each other, and look'd deadly pale.

SHAKSPEARE.

2. And when they talk of him, they shake their heads,
And whisper one another in the ear;

And he that speaks doth gripe the hearer's wrist,
And he that hears makes fearful action,

With wrinkled brow, with nods, with rolling eyes.

SHAKSPEARE.

3. What mighty contests rise from trivial things!

4. A tale more strange ne'er grac'd the poet's art, And ne'er did fiction play so wild a part.

POPE.

TICKELL.

WORDS.

1. What you keep by you, you may change and mend; But words, once spoke, can never be recall'd.

ROSCOMMON.

2. Words are the soul's ambassadors, which go
Abroad upon her errands to and fro;

They are the sole expounders of the mind,
And correspondence keep 'twixt all mankind.

1.

JAMES HOWEL.

3. But words are things; and a small drop of ink,
Falling like dew upon a thought, produces
That which makes thousands, perhaps millions, think.
BYRON'S Don Juan.

3.

WORLD.

All the world's a stage;
And all the men and women merely players:
They have their exits and their entrances;
And one man in his turn plays many parts.

2. The world is a great dance, in which we find
The good and bad have various turns assign'd;
But when they've ended the great masquerade,
One goes to glory, th' other to a shade.

4. The world is a well-furnish'd table,

CROWN.

The world's a stormy sea,

Whose every breath is strew'd with wrecks of wretches,
That daily perish in it.

Where guests are promiscuously set:
Where all fare as well as they're able,
And scramble for what they can get.

SHAKSPEARE.

5. 'Tis pleasant, through the loopholes of retreat, To peep at such a world; to see the stir

Of the great Babel, and not feel the crowd;

To hear the roar she sends through all her gates,

At a safe distance, where the dying sound
Falls a soft murmur on th' uninjur'd ear.

Rowe.

BICKERSTAFF.

COWPER'S Task.

506

WORTH-WRITERS, &c.

6. A world, where lust of pleasure, grandeur, gold,— Three demons that divide its realms between them— With strokes alternate buffet to and fro

7.

Man's restless heart, their sport, their flying ball.
YOUNG'S Night Thoughts.

What is this world?

What- but a spacious burial-field unwall'd,
Strew'd with death's spoils, the spoils of animals,
Savage and tame, and full of dead men's bones?
The very turf on which we tread, once liv'd;
And we, that live, must lend our carcasses
To cover our own offspring: in their turns
They too must cover theirs!

8. This world is all a fleeting show,
For man's illusion given;
The smiles of joy, the tears of wo,
Deceitful shine, deceitful flow;

There's nothing true but Heaven.

BLAIR'S Grave.

9. Yes, fair as the syren, but false as her song,

Are the world's painted shadows, that lure us along;
Like the mist on the mountain, the foam on the deep,
Or the voices of friends that we greet in our sleep,
Are the pleasures of earth.

MRS. S. J. HALE.

WORTH. (See EXCELLENCE.)

WRITERS. (See AUTHORS.)

WRONG. (See INJURY.)

YOUTH. (See CHILDHOOD.)

ZEAL. (See ENTHUSIASM.)

THE END.

MOORE.

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