Powers: A Study in Metaphysics

Front Cover
Clarendon Press, 30. nov 2006 - 252 pages
0 Reviews
Arvustused pole kinnitatud, aga Google kontrollib neid võltssisu suhtes ja eemaldab selle.
George Molnar came to see that the solution to a number of the problems of contemporary philosophy lay in the development of an alternative to Hume's metaphysics. This alternative would have real causal powers at its centre. Molnar set about developing a thorough account of powers that might persuade those who remained, perhaps unknowingly, in the grip of Humean assumptions. He succeeded in producing something both highly focused and at the same time wide-ranging. He showed both that the notion of a power was central and that it could serve to dispel a number of long-standing philosophical problems. Molnar's account of powers is as realist as any that has so far appeared. He shows that dispositions are as real as any other properties. Specifically, they do not depend for their existence on their manifestations. Nevertheless, they are directed towards such manifestations. Molnar thus appropriates the notion of intentionality, from Brentano, and argues that it is the essential characteristic of powers. He offers a persuasive case for there being some basic and ungrounded powers, thus ruling out the reducibility of the dispositional to the non-dispositional. However, he does allow that there are non-power properties as well as power properties. In this respect, his final position is dualistic. This is contemporary metaphysics of the highest quality. It is a work that was almost complete when its author died. It has been edited for publication by another specialist in the subject, Stephen Mumford, who has also provided an introduction that will allow non-specialists to become acquainted with the issues. David Armstrong, one of the greatest living metaphysicians and personal friend of George Molnar, has provided a Foreword.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

George Molnar and Powers
1
POWERS
19
Properties
21
On What There Is
47
3 Directedness
60
4 Independence
82
5 Actuality
99
6 Intrinsicality
102
8 Do Powers Need Grounds?
125
9 The Ontology of Powers
143
10 NonPowers
158
11 Objections Considered
173
12 Powers at Work
186
References
224
Index
233
Copyright

7 Objectivity
111

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information