The Polytechnic Review and Magazine of Science, Literature and the Fine Arts, 2. köide

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John Mortimer, 1845
 

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Page 120 - You must have no dependence on your own genius. If you have great talents, industry will improve them ; if you have but moderate abilities, industry will supply their deficiency. Nothing is denied to well-directed labour: nothing is to be obtained without it...
Page 327 - And God said, Let there be lights in the firmament of the heaven to divide the day from the night ; and let them be for signs and for seasons, and for days,
Page 445 - The whole train of animated beings, from the simplest and oldest up to the highest and most recent, are, then, to be regarded as a series of advances of the principle of development, which have depended upon external physical circumstances, to which the resulting animals are appropriate.
Page 236 - Here Britain's statesmen oft the fall foredoom Of foreign tyrants, and of nymphs at home; Here thou, great ANNA ! whom three realms obey, Dost sometimes counsel take — and sometimes tea.
Page 237 - By the wolf-scaring faggot that guarded the slain, At the dead of the night a sweet vision I saw; And thrice ere the morning I dreamt it again.
Page 124 - This idea of the perfect state of nature, which the Artist calls ' the Ideal Beauty, is the great leading principle by which works of genius are conducted.
Page 140 - They that go down to the sea in ships : and occupy their business in great waters ; These men see the works of the LORD : and His wonders in the deep.
Page 124 - All the objects which are exhibited to our view by Nature, upon close examination will be found to have their blemishes and defects.
Page 116 - Immediately notified the arrival to the King and Prince of Wales ; the last came immediately. I, according to the established etiquette, introduced (no one else being in the room) the Princess Caroline to him. She very properly, in consequence of my saying to her that it was the right mode of proceeding, attempted to kneel to him.
Page 124 - ... forms ; and which by a long habit of observing what any set of objects of the same kind have in common, has acquired the power of discerning what each wants in particular.

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