Bacon and Essex: A Sketch of Bacon's Earlier Life

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Seeley, Jackson, & Halliday, 1877 - 304 pages
 

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Page 2 - ... declaration of the practices and treasons attempted and committed by Robert, late Earl of Essex, and his complices...
Page 23 - I have taken all knowledge to be my province ; and if I could purge it of two sorts of rovers, whereof the one with frivolous disputations, confutations, and verbosities, the other with blind experiments and auricular traditions and impostures, hath committed so many spoils, I hope I should bring in industrious observations, grounded conclusions, and profitable inventions and discoveries ; the best state of that province. This, whether it be curiosity, or vain glory, or nature, or (if one take it...
Page 45 - Full little knowest thou, that hast not tried, What hell it is in suing long to bide: To lose good days, that might be better spent; To waste long nights in pensive discontent; To speed to-day, to be put back to-morrow; To feed on hope, to pine with fear and sorrow; To have thy prince's grace, yet want her peers...
Page 5 - He bade me take no care for that, and pressed it : whereupon I said, " My lord, I see I must be your " homager, and hold land of your gift ; but do you " know the manner of doing homage in law? Always " it is with a saving of his faith to the king and his " other lords ; and therefore, my lord, said I, I can be " no more yours than I was, and it must be with the " ancient savings: and if 1 grow to be a rich man, " you will give me leave to give it back again to some " of your unrewarded followers.
Page 22 - I commend myself unto your Lordship. I wax now somewhat ancient ; one and thirty years is a great deal of sand in the hour-glass. My health, I thank God, I find confirmed ; and I do not fear that action shall impair it, because I account my ordinary course of study and meditation to be more painful than most parts of action are.
Page 174 - That because it was considered how I stood tied to my lord of Essex, therefore that part was thought fittest for me, which did him least hurt: for that whereas all the rest was matter of charge and accusation, this only was but matter of caveat and admonition. Wherewith though I was in mine own mind little satisfied, because I knew well a man were better to be charged with some faults, than admonished of some others: yet the conclusion binding upon the queen's pleasure directly, volens nolens...
Page 159 - I) it is now far too late, the matter is cold and hath taken too much wind; whereat she seemed again offended and rose from me, and that resolution for a while continued; and after, in the beginning of Midsummer term, I attending her, and finding her settled in that resolution (which I heard of also otherwise), she falling upon the like speech, it is true that, seeing no other remedy, I said to her slightly, Why, Madam, if you will needs have a proceeding, you were best have it in some such sort...
Page 113 - I did as plainly see his overthrow chained as it were by destiny to that journey, as it is possible for a man to ground a judgment upon future contingents.
Page 55 - I have learned that it may be redeemed. For means, I value that most ; and the rather, because I am purposed, not to follow the practice of the law, if her Majesty command me in any particular, I shall be ready to do her willing service ; and my reason is only, because it drinketh too much time, which I have dedicated to better purposes.
Page 238 - I put in writing, commanded me to pen that book, which was published for the better satisfaction of the world ; which I did, but so, as never secretary had more particular and express directions and instructions in every point how to guide my hand in it ; and not only so, but after...

About the author (1877)

Edwin A. Abbott was born December 20, 1838. He attended City of London School and Cambridge, where he was an honor student in the classics. Following the career path of his father, Abbott was ordained an Anglican minister. Later he rejected a career as a clergyman and at the age of twenty-six, he returned to City of London School as Headmaster, a position he held for twenty-five years. Always curious about views from varying perspectives, he promoted a liberal attitude toward people of differing backgrounds. As president of the Teachers Training Society, for example, he lobbied for access to university education for women. He resigned as Headmaster at age fifty-three in protest of proposed changes to the mission of the school. Abbott wrote more than fifty books on widely different topics. He had published two series of his sermons while at Cambridge, a book on Shakespearean grammar, and accounts of his efforts to admit women to higher education. His most notable work is Flatland, written in 1884. Flatland is still widely read by both mathematicians and science-fiction readers because of its portrayal of the idea of higher dimensions. The narrator, a two-dimensional square called A Square happens into a three-dimensional world where he gains a wider vision into objects in his two-dimensional home. The book was a favorite with C. S. Lewis. Abbott died on October 12, 1926.

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