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PRICES of STOCKS from July 29 to Aug. 29, 1801.

Days

Bank India 13 perCt3 perCt 4 perCt 5 perCt 5 perCt Long Stock. Stock. RedAn Cons. Cons. Ann. 1797. Ann.

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MONDAY MORNING, AUG. 31. NO intelligence of importance from France, Germany, or Egypt, had reached town when this publication was put to press.

The reports in circulation yesterday and Saturday afternoon, respecting the suspension of hostilities by the agreement of both governments, to a naval armistice, are unsupported either by any thing like respectable authority, or by any just arguments drawn from the actual state and political relation of Great-Britain and France. Such a measure, in all its latitude, can only follow from the signing of preliminaries of peace; for were we to grant to the enemy, before that event, an armistice by sea, we should deprive ourselves of all the advantages we possess in consequence of our vast superiority on that element, and give to him, by raising the blockade in which the whole line of his coast opposite to us is held, every advantage he could possibly desire. In order to secure the success of negociation, a continuance of hostilities is absolutely necessary; and a suspension of them would but enable the French government to protract that great and desirable end. A naval armistice must entirely depend upon the satisfactory progress made in negociation; but should his Majesty's Ministers accede to it, there can be no doubt, that they will take particular care to render it as little profitable to the enemy as possible, by proper conditions and restrictions.

It is, however, a general opinion in the ministerial circles, that Bonaparte has, in his recent communications with ministers, by the agency of M. Otto, evinced a greater degree of sincerity in his proposals than on any former occasion. We have even heard, as report, from a respectable quarter, that his delay in marching troops into Portugal, to take possession of the ports and fortresses of that kingdom, has originated in his compliance with the suggestions of our government. A new plan of preliminaries, more equitable than might have been expected, and transmitted in the beginning of last week from Paris, is confidently said to have engaged the attention of the cabinet council held last Wednesday at Lord' Hawkesbury's office.

Lord Nelson continued on Saturday evening in the Downs with the principal part of his squadron; but as he had shifted his flag from the Medusa to the Amazon frigate, and orders had been issued to the commanders of the different vessels to hold themselves in readiness to sail at a moment's notice, it was supposed that his Lordship would immediately put to sea.

The dispatches received on Saturday from Captain Bowen of the Argo frigate and Colonel Clinton, who commands the troops landed ar Madeira, do not as it has been erroneously stated, con tain the conditions upon which they have been received in that island. They merely notice the arrival of the troops and the friendly reception given to them by the Portuguese governor, as auxiliaries of his court.

UNION MAGAZINE,

For SEPTEMBER, 1801.

ORNAMENTED WITH A PORTRAIT OF DR. SAMUEL PARR, AND A VIEW
OF BUTCHER-ROW, LOOKING FROM TEMPL2-BAR, IN 1796.

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Sold by Lackington, Allen, and Co. Finsbury-Square; Vernor and Hood, in the Poultry;
1. Hurst, Paternoster-Row; W. Chapple, Pall Mall; R. Ryan, Oxford-Street;
J. Archer, and B. Dugdale, Dublin; and by all the Booksellers

throughout the United Kingdom.

J. Cundee, Printer, Ivy-lane.

To Correspondents.

WE thank J. G. for his Remarks, and shall, at all times, be obliged to him for whatever suggestions he may think proper to make.

The UNION CLUB has not, we have reason to believe, answered the object of its institution.

Doctor MONTUCci's papers are under consideration, and shall be noticed in our next number.

We are convinced, that LUDOVICUS must, upon mature reflection, perceive the impossibility of complying with his wishes.

THE

UNION MAGAZINE,

AND

IMPERIAL REGISTER.

No. IX.-SEPTEMBER, 1801.

HISTORY OF THE UNION WITH IRELAND.

[Continued from Page 75 of our last.]

THE event realised the predictions of this intelligent writer, and

the fpirit of alarm and discontent received a powerful impulse from the proceedings of the Irish bar. Fully apprised of the determination of government to bring forward the question of incorporative union, they took the earliest and most effectual means of deterring the friends of the measure from persisting in the design. A numerous mecting of the profession, which was attended by its most distinguished members, accordingly took place at Dublin, on the 9th of December, 1798, for the express purpose of considering the proposed union between Great Britain and Ireland.

par

Mr. Ambrose Smith, the father or senior of the bar, having been called to the chair, the discussion was opened by Mr. Saurin. He maintained that it was the duty of the meeting to declare to the country their sentiments on a proposition, which, if carried into effect, would destroy for ever the constitution of Ireland. It was obvious, that the manners and interests of the people could not be improved with as much success by the care of a British liament, as by one of their own; and that it would be the inclination and duty of the united legislature, whenever the views of both countries might be different, to give a decided preference to those of Great Britain. None, he contended, could deny, that upon the incorporation of the two legislatures, one of their principal objects would be the distribution of the burthen of public debt and expense equally or proportionably, over every part of the empire, and it did not require much argument to shew, that the system of Irish taxation would be strained to the utmost limit of the country's capacity. At all events, it was not at the termination of a rebellion which had shaken the state to its centre, that a question of such magnitude ought to be discussed;-it was not when an army

of

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