Page images
PDF
EPUB

PRICES of STOCKS from Sept. 28 to Oct. 25.

[blocks in formation]

581

I

592

23

[blocks in formation]

6182 7 1844

211

673

Bank India 3 per Ct 3 perCt/4 perCt 5 perCt 5 perC Long Stock. Stock. RedAn Cons.

Sund.

Cons. Ann. 1797.

[blocks in formation]

Ann.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][subsumed][subsumed][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

103

2109

68

8

1834 211

67

9 1844 2124

[merged small][ocr errors][merged small]
[blocks in formation]

102

1024 103 1024

674

6712 15-16 674 12 15-16 678 121

22

[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]

854

1024

1011/

664/

673

85

1011

100

664

684

85

102

ΙΟΙ

[blocks in formation]

2 2 2 2 2

21

22

222

21

24

Sund.

19

681

691

88

1024

102

201

5 3.16

24

20 187

215

694

1024

25

21 186

213

69

1011

5 3-16

24

[blocks in formation]

221

214

69/

102

5

3-16

24

99

23 1854

215

684

6912

10111

54

24 16

24 186

220

681/ 691

861

101

101

20 5-16

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]

25 Sund.

This Table contains the highest Price each Day.

POSTSCRIPT.

SATURDAY MORNING, Oer. 31.

ALL political intelligence from the Continent becomes every day less interesting, as the public mind seems entirely occupied in the important question of pacification. Marquis CORNWALLIS will certainly set off for France early in the ensuing week, and remain at Paris until after the general festival, which is to be held there on the 9th of November, in celebration of the peace. His Lordship's visit to Amiens will not take up much time, as it is ascertained, that the great points of the definitive treaty have been settled to the satisfaction of the two governments. The meeting of the plenipotentiaries will be more a matter of form than of business. The basis of a commercial treaty with France, in which the Batavian Republic is to be comprehended, has been also laid down, and will, in all probability, be signed at the same

time.

The unanimity with which the address, in both Houses of Parliament, have been voted for his MAJESTY'S Speech, must be peculiarly gratifying to the general sentiment, and to the feelings of ministers. They possess just claims to the gratitude of the country for the wisdom and promptitude with which they have realized their pacific professions.

This unanimity has, however, been obtained by the omission of the addresses of the commendation passed upon the terms of the treaty in the speech. His MAJESTY trusts, "that this important arfangement will be found conducive to the substantial interests of this country, and honourable to the British character;" and the Lords and Commons merely say, that "they learn, with great satisfaction, that preliminaries of peace have been signed with the French Republic."

Whatever may be the sentiments of individuals, both in and out of parliament, with respect to the nature of the conditions, there can be no doubt, that the treaty will be sanctioned by a vast majority of the nation, and its representatives.

UNION MAGAZINE,

For NOVEMBER, 1801.

ORNAMENTED WITH A PORTRAIT OF THE REV. RICHARD GRAVES.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

Sold by Lackington, Allen, and Co. Finsbury-Square; Vernor and Hood, in the Poultry;‹ i T. Hurst, Paternoster-Row; W. Chapple, Pall-Mall; R. Ryan, Oxford-Street;

J. Archer, and B. Dugdale, Dublin; and by all the Booksellers

throughout the United Kingdom.

J. Cundee, Printer, Ivy-lane.

J. G's suggestions are entitled to our sincere thanks. His proposal of a regular summary of all the great events which have taken place from the commencement of hostilities to the conclu sion of peace, is under consideration,

We must once more remark, in answer to the repeated applications of JUNIUS REDIVIVUS, that the UNION MAGAZINE shall never be made the instrument of political squabbles or personal animosity.

Our correspondent, TISIPHONE, would not be in such a fury were he to consider the great rise in the price of paper since the commencement of the publication.

Mr. P. may be supplied with the sheet, left out by the binder, by applying to the publisher.

TO OUR READERS.

*

** Our readers will observe that we have omitted this month the additional engraving, which we have been in the custom of giving. This omission, we beg leave to assure them, does not arise from any wish on the part of the proprietors to contract their expences, but from an earnest desire to render the publication still more worthy of the liberal and extensive patronage with which it is honoured. They have, therefore, determined to give, every three months, instead of monthly, an engraving, executed in the best possible manner, and descriptive of some object of superior interest. They will also, by this arrangement, have the satisfaction of obviating complaints occasioned by the want of punctuality on the part of the engraver, which has some months prevented the publication of the work at a period as early as they

wished.

The cessation of almost every kind of important political intelligence from the continent, necessarily calls for the omission of the Postcript, which our subscribers will recollect was originally devoted to that purpose. Should, however, any event of real moment unexpectedly occur, it shall be noticed in the usual way.

THE

UNION MAGAZINE,

AND

IMPERIAL REGISTER.

No. XI.-NOVEMBER, 1801.

HISTORY OF THE UNION WITH IRELAND.

[Continued from Page 215 of our last]

MR. Arthur Moore maintained, that though parliament might assume the power, it had not the right to change, much less to abrogate altogether the constitution of the land, of which they were only the delegated functionaries, and not the exclusive owners. He contended, if, by the violent exercise of the abstract power of parliament to do that, to which its moral competence was insufficient, the measure of a Union should be carried against the sense of the people, that in such a case the laws of the incor*porated legislature would not bind Ireland, and that then the question of resistance would, in the words of Mr. Fox, be no longer a question of morality, but of prudence. If these were deemed strong doctrines, it was incumbent to enquire who had forced them from him? Those who had made a most atrocious attack upon the independent parliament of the country, which he was sworn to defend, as part of the existing constitution, in which no man was altogether sui suris, but a trustee for the rights of others, whose boast and birthright it was.

He would put that case, although it had not been yet stated, notwithstanding the various hypotheses advanced upon the wild project of destroying their excellent practical establishment.Suppose it were proposed to reduce the number of members in either house of parliament, or to reduce the number of members in that house to one hundred, would any man hear it without indignation? Would the nation be bound to submit to it, should the

parlia

« EelmineJätka »