The Scientific Proceedings of the Royal Dublin Society

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Page 542 - Now these animals are, they declare, so swift, that there is nothing in the world like them : if it were not, therefore, that the Indians get a start while the ants are mustering, not a single gold-gatherer could escape. During the flight the male camels, which are not so fleet...
Page 17 - Scotia, gives for the Greenwich rocks a quality intermediate between those of the Edinburgh rocks. But we are very ignorant as to the effects of high temperatures in altering the conductivities and specific heats of rocks, and as to their latent heat of fusion. We must therefore allow very wide limits in such an estimate as I have attempted to make ; but I think we may with much probability say that the consolidation cannot have taken place less than 20,000,000 years ago, or we should have more underground...
Page 438 - ... goes back to human consciousness, from which every man of science has to proceed as his consciousness. This consciousness, just on account of the abnormal character of things, is not the same in all. If the normal condition of things had not been broken, consciousness would emit the same sound from all ; but as a matter of fact, this is not the case. In the one the consciousness of sin is very powerful and strong, in the other it is either feeble or entirely wanting.
Page 524 - Smyth says that the present condition of the country is, that it is covered with ' tailings,' and corresponds to that of an abandoned Australian washing. Still it is the case that : — " On washing a few dishes of the surface soil anywhere a few streaks of very fine gold will be found. In the vicinity of the reefs rather heavy gold is got by sluicing ; and if a suitable spot be selected the native miners will obtain, even by their methods, sufficient gold to remunerate them for their labour." I...
Page 533 - ... This, from various reasons, I was not prepared to expect. Colonel Haughton, who speaks of the granitic gneissose rocks as igneous, states that gold is never found in the streams traversing them. Again, the natives, so far as my experience goes, do not wash in the sands...
Page 524 - They are, even when in solid quartz, sometimes 70 feet deep, with smooth sides and quite plumb; what the tools were which enabled the miners to produce such work in hard, dense, quartz, no one appears to be able to suggest. The fragments of stone obtained from these various mines were pounded with hand mullers, the pounding places being still seen, and the pounded stone was then, it is believed, washed in a wooden dish and treated with mercury. The Korumbas or gold washers, who are admitted to be...
Page 505 - This field is situated to the south of the Bokaro field in the valley of the Damuda. Its area is 40 square miles. The following groups only occur as in the case of the Jeriah field; it is uncertain whether the higher groups were denuded or were never deposited:— Ranigunj, . . . . ? feet Ironstone shale, . . . .1,200 „ Barakar, ..... 3,000 „ Talchir, ..... 850 „ 4,050 ,, The coal is for the most part of poor quality and limited in extent.
Page 506 - This is a small field of less than one square mile in extent. The chief point of interest about it is its position, which is on the Hazaribagh plateau, at an elevation of about 2,000 feet above the sea, or nearly 1,000 above the nearest fields in the valley of the Damuda. The groups represented are the Barakar and Talchir. There is only one seam of coal, and it is of poor qualit}'.
Page 514 - NE of Warora, in the Chanda district. The existence of coal measures under a small tract of Kamthi beds, 5 to 6 miles square, has been proved by boring. Three seams of coal have been ascertained to exist, and these have a maximum total thickness of 38 feet. The coal is similar in character to that of Warora.
Page 439 - The inclination of the orbit to the "proper plane" must have been larger in the past, and may be traced back from the present 5° 9' until it was G° or 7°. This was a maximum inclination, and in the more remote past the inclination was less and initially was very small or zero. 3. The inclination of the proper plane to the ecliptic must have been greater in the past, and may be traced back from its present 8...

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