The Brain as an Organ of Mind

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Appleton, 1880 - 708 pages

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Contents

Three bipolar Ganglion Cells from the auditory nerve of the Pike Stricker
11
Division of a very slender Nerve Fibre and its communication with a plexus of fibrils Gerlach
12
Multipolar Ganglion Cell from anterior grey matter of the Spinal Cord of an Ox Deiters
13
Motor Nerve Cells connected by intercellular processes Vogt
14
Sympathetic Ganglion Cell of a Frog Quain after Beale
15
Multipolar Ganglion cells from Sympathetic of Man Max Schultze
16
Nervous System of one of the Eolidæ Gegenbauer
17
Nervous System of the Great Green Grasshopper Newport
18
Transverse Section through Human Spinal Cord Sappey after Stilling
19
General View of Nervous System of Man Mivart
20
Nervous System of an Ascidian Solly after Cuvier
21
an Oyster Todd the Common Mussel Owen
22
the Common Limpet Todd
24
a Chiton Garner
25
CHAPTER II
26
Nervous System of the Common Slug Solly after Baly
27
Head and Brain of a Nemertean After McIntosh
30
Nervous System of the Medicinal Leech Owen
31
a Serpula Gegenbauer after Quatrefages
32
Anterior part of the Nervous System of an lulus Owen
33
Nervous System of a Common Sandhopper Grant
34
Nervous System of Cymothoa Grant
35
CHAPTER III
55
CHAPTER IV
70
29
78
CHAPTER V
86
CHAPTER VI
93
36
95
39
102
Data CONCERNING THE BRAIN DERIVED FROM THE STUDY
107
9
109
THE BRAIN OF FISHES AND OF AMPHIBIA
111
Brain and Cranial Nerves of the Perch side view Gegenbauer after
113
Brain and Spinal Cord of the Frog Solly
119
THE BRAIN OF REPTILES AND OF Birds
125
Brain and Cranial Nerven of Boa Constrictor Rymer Jones after Swan
126
Yin PAGE 130 The inner aspect of the right half of the Foetal Brain at six months
130
Brain of Common Fowl Spurzheim
133
CHAPTER X
138
CHAPTER XI
156
CHAPTER XII
168
CHAPTER XIII
195
CHAPTER XIV
220
Brain of the Horse outer surface Sully after Leuret
256
1
260
Dolphin under surface Owen after Tiedemann
262
CHAPTER XX
347
Dura Mater with its vessels enveloping the Brain 1fter Hirschfeld
348
Human Cerebrum and Cerebellum side view After Hirschfeld
349
30
360
CHAPTER XXI
376
Brain of the Hottentot Venus side view Vogt after Gratiolet
377
134 upper aspect Vogt after Gratiolet
378
a Bushwoman upper aspect Heath after Marshall
380
lateral aspect Heath after Marshall
381
Right Cerebral ilemisphere of a Scotchman outer aspect Turner
382
Upper aspect of the Brain of a Scotchman Turner
383
Inner Face and Tentorial Surface of the Left Cerebral Hemisphere Tur ner
384
View of the Orbital Lobule and of the Island of Reil Turner
385
Brain of Gauss the celebrated Mathematician and Astronomer upper aspect Sharpey after R Wagner
387
Brain of Gauss side view Vogt after R Wagner 359
391
Uoder surface oi the Human Brain Allen Thomson
397
Under surface of Cerebral Peduncles Pons and Medulla Sappey after Hirschfeld
398
Section through the left occipital Lobe of a Human Brain
399
View of Occipital Lobes and of Cerebellum from behind showing the Occi pital Groove
402
Posterior diagrammatic view of Dura Mater with great Venous Sinuses Todd
403
Upper surface of the Cerebellum Sappey after Hirschfeld
405
Inferior surface of the Cerebellum Sappey after Hirschfeld
406
FROM BRUTE TO HUMAN INTELLIGENCE
411
CHAPTER XXIII
428
9
430
Third and Fourth Ventricles of the Brain exposed After Sharpey
431
Longitudinal Vertical Section through the Left Hemisphere showing the Lateral Ventricle and its three Cornu Sappey after Hirschfeld
432
Decussation of the Motor Fibres in the Medulla and Pons Broadbent 155 Under surface of Brain dissected Broadbent
435
Central Ganglia of the Brain together with the Cerebellum and its Supe rior Peduncles daprey after Hirschfeld
437
Transverse Section of the Cerebrum showing course of certain Fibres Broadbent
439
Section through the third Frontal Convolution of Man Ferrier after Meynert
446
Large Pyramidal Cell with its processes a socalled GiantCell Charcot
447
Section of the Involuted Layer of the Hippocampus Meynert
450
Longitudinal Section through the centre of the Brain showing the inner face of Left Cerebral Hernisphere Sappey after Hirschfeld
452
Horizontal Section through the Cranium and the Cerebral Hemispheres showing the Centrum ovale Sappey after Vicq dAzyr
454
Horizontal Section through the Cerebrum at a deeper level showing the Third Ventricle and its Commissures Sappey
455
The Upper Peduncles of the Cerebellum with the Fourth Ventricle and contiguous parts Sappey after Hirschfeld 166 The Middle Cerebellar Peduncle...
461
after Hirschfeld
463
THE FUNCTIONAL RELATIONS OF THE Principal Parts
477
CHAPTER XXV
511
99
520
CHAPTER XXVI
548
CEREBRAL MENTAL SUBSTRATA
589
CHAPTER XXX
673
APPENDIX
691
Dog Ferrier
701

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Page 235 - Under changed conditions of life, it is at least possible that slight modifications of instinct might be profitable to a species; and if it can be shown that instincts do vary ever so little, then I can see no difficulty in natural selection preserving and continually accumulating variations of instinct to any extent that may be profitable. It is thus, as I believe, that all the most complex and wonderful instincts have originated.
Page 548 - The motion of our body follows upon the command of our will. Of this we are every moment conscious. But the means, by which this is effected ; the energy, by which the will performs so extraordinary an operation ; of this we are so far from being immediately conscious, that it must for ever escape our most diligent enquiry.
Page 154 - It would be incompatible with everything we know of the cerebral action, to suppose that the physical chain ends abruptly in a physical void, occupied by an immaterial substance; which immaterial substance, after working alone, imparts its results to the other edge of the physical break, and determines the active response — two shores of the material with an intervening ocean of the immaterial.
Page 175 - ... one, is the result. Ideas, also, which have been so often conjoined, that whenever one exists in the mind, the others immediately exist along with it, seem to run into one another, to coalesce, as it were, and out of many to form one idea; which idea, however in reality complex, appears to be no less simple than any one of those of which it is compounded.
Page 159 - Centipede be cut off, whilst it is in motion, the body will continue to move onwards by the action of the legs; and the same will take place in the separate parts, if the body be divided into several distinct...
Page 250 - Zoology (the stoparola of Ray) builds every year in the vines that grow on the walls of my house. A pair of these little birds had one year inadvertently placed their nest on a naked bough, perhaps in a shady time, not being aware of the inconvenience that followed. But...
Page 169 - ... in these modifications, a quality, a phenomenon of mind, absolutely new, has been superadded, which was never involved in, and could therefore never have been evolved out of, the mere faculty of knowledge. The faculty of knowledge is certainly the first in order, inasmuch as it is the conditio sine qua non of the others...
Page 289 - ... of Simian brains, this hiatus does not lie between Man and the man-like apes, but between the lower and the lowest Simians; or, in other words, between the old and new world apes and monkeys, and the Lemurs. Every Lemur which has yet been examined, in fact, has its cerebellum partially visible from above, and its posterior lobe, with the contained posterior cornu and hippocampus minor, more or less rudimentary. Every Marmoset, American monkey, old world monkey, Baboon, or Man-like ape, on the...
Page 6 - ... system. The red crystals turn yellow when heated, and resume their red tint on cooling. The yellow crystals obtained by sublimation retain their colour when cooled ; but, on the slightest rubbing or stirring with a pointed instrument, the part which is touched turns scarlet, and this change of colour extends with a slight motion, as if the mass were alive, throughout the whole group of crystals as far as they adhere together.
Page 327 - When asked how he could possibly learn so soon whether a particular monkey would turn out a good actor, he answered that it all depended on their power of attention. If, when he was talking and explaining anything to a monkey, its attention was easily distracted, as by a fly on the wall or other trifling object, the case was hopeless.

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