Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution

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Page 18 - On the Structure of Cancerous Tumors and the Mode in which Adjacent Parts are Invaded.
Page 18 - Lectures" have been instituted at Washington, DC, by Joseph M. Toner, MD, who has placed in charge of a Board of Trustees, consisting of the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, the Surgeon-General of the United States Army, the Surgeon-General of the United States Navy, and the President of the Medical Society of the District of Columbia...
Page 338 - ... dew-point — may widely differ. It is impossible to represent all these differences by statistical tables, but the fact has been forcibly impressed upon the compiler during the minute examinations necessary to the preparation of this report. " Third. Next to dryness, in importance, is an equable temperature, a temperature uniform for long periods, and not disturbed by sudden or frequent changes. A uniformly low temperature is much to be preferred to a uniformly high temperature. The former exerts...
Page 186 - II. b of the plate, rather towards yellowish red. " Rule. — This test, which is applied only to those completely color-blind, should be continued until the person examined has placed beside the specimen all the skeins belonging to this shade or the greater part, or else...
Page 86 - In pursuing these ethnographic investigations it has been the endeavor, as far as possible, to produce results that would be of practical value in the administration of Indian affairs ; and, for this purpose, especial attention has been paid to...
Page 191 - If he seem to be disposed to confound green and gray, it will be very easy to entrap him. If we do not succeed, even when assisting him, in entrapping him in this snare, the hidden samples may be put back into their places, to be convinced that the trial is correct. " From the above, it is seen that many artifices may be necessary in our examination. It may be regarded as an advantage of our method that it has at command a great variety of resources. We have by no means mentioned all; and yet many...
Page 184 - The well-defined kiuds and degrees of a defective chromatic sense confound only colors of mean intensity. I have selected, to determine whether the chromatic sense is or is not defective, a light green (dark green may be also used), because green, according to the theory, is the whitest of the colors of the spectrum, and consequently is most easily confused with gray. For the diagnosis of the especial kinds of partial color-blindness, I have selected purple (pink), that is, the whole group of colors...
Page 284 - The great mount is in the form of a cone, about forty or fifty feet high, and the circumference of its base two or three hundred yards, entirely composed of the loamy rich earth of the low grounds: the...
Page 187 - The best plan for directing how to proceed is by oral instructions and de visu ; but here we are obliged to accomplish this by description. Now, this is always defective in some respects, especially if we wish to be brief. What has been said would evidently suffice for an intelligent and experienced physician ; but it may not be superfluous to enter still further into detail to provide against any possible difficulties and loss of time. The object of the examination is to discover the nature of a...
Page 189 - Names are used to remind him that one class of green may be yellow-green ; and another, blue-green ; and, to induce him to avoid them, he is advised only to select skeins of the same shade as the specimen, although they be lighter or darker, and have neither more yellow nor blue than that. If his first error arose only from a misconception or want of practice in handling colours, he begins generally to understand what he has to do, and to do properly what is required of him. " 2. Or else he selects...

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