A short statement of the origin and nature of the present divisions in the Church of Scotland, by a minister of the Church of Scotland [J. Cumming].

Front Cover
J.G.F. & J. Rivington, 1840 - 32 pages

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 11 - Assembly declare that it is a " fundamental law of this Church, that no pastor " shall be intruded on any congregation, contrary to
Page 12 - Church ; and further declare that no person shall be held to be entitled to disapprove, as aforesaid, who shall refuse, if required solemnly, to declare in presence of the Presbytery, that he is actuated by no factious or malicious motive, but solely by a conscientious regard to the spiritual interests of himself or the congregation...
Page 12 - ... and in full communion with the Church, shall disapprove of the person in whose favour the call is proposed to be moderated in, such disapproval shall be deemed sufficient ground for the presbytery rejecting such person, and that he shall be rejected accordingly and due notice thereof forthwith given to all concerned...
Page 18 - Find, that the defenders, the Presbytery of Auchterarder, did refuse, and continue to refuse, to take trial of the qualifications of the. said Robert Young, and have rejected him as presentee to the said church and parish, on the sole ground (as they admit on the Record), that a majority of the male heads of families, communicants in the said parish, have dissented, •without any reason assigned from his admission as minister : Find, that the said Presbytery in so doing have acted to the hurt and...
Page 7 - Church, that no minister shall be intruded into any pastoral charge, contrary to the will of the congregation ; and considering that doubts and misapprehensions have existed on this important subject, whereby the just and salutary operation of the said principle has been impeded, and in many cases defeated, The General Assembly...
Page 11 - The General Assembly declare, That it is a fundamental law of this Church, that no pastor shall be intruded on any congregation contrary to the will of the people : and, in order that this principle may be carried into full effect, the General Assembly, with the consent of a majority of the Presbyteries of this Church, do declare, enact, and ordain, That it shall be an instruction to Presbyteries, that if, at the moderating in a call to a vacant pastoral charge, the major part of the male heads of...
Page 8 - ... any objection personal to the presentee in regard to his ministerial gifts or qualifications, either in general or with reference to that particular parish ; and in order that this declaration may be carried into full effect, that a committee shall be appointed to prepare the best measures for carrying it into effect accordingly, and to report to the next General Assembly.
Page 12 - That it shall be an instruction to Presbyteries, that if, at the moderating in a Call to a vacant pastoral charge, the major part of the male heads of families, members of the vacant congregation, and in full communion with the Church, shall disapprove of the person in whose favour the Call is proposed to be moderated in, such disapproval shall be deemed sufficient ground for the Presbytery rejecting such person, and that he shall be rejected accordingly...
Page 18 - ... find, that the said Presbytery in so doing have acted to the hurt and prejudice of the said pursuers, illegally, and in violation of their duty, and contrary to the provisions of certain statutes libelled on, and in particular contrary to the provisions of the statute of 10 Anne, c.
Page 22 - And whereas the principle of Non-intrusion is one coeval with the reformed Kirk of Scotland, and forms an integral part of its constitution, embodied in its standards and declared in various Acts of Assembly, the General Assembly resolve that this principle cannot be abandoned, and that no presentee 50 A HISTORY OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY.

Bibliographic information