The Rise of British West Africa: Comprising the Early History of the Colony of Sierra Leone, the Gambia, Lagos, Gold Coast, Etc., Etc. with a Brief Account of Climate, the Growth of Education, Commerce and Religion and a Comprehensive History of the Bananas and Bance Islands and Sketches of the Constitution

Front Cover
Houlston & Sons, 1904 - 468 pages

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 394 - An Act for the further security of His Majesty's person and Government, and the succession of the Crown in the Heirs of the late Princess Sophia, being Protestants, and for extinguishing the hopes of the pretended Prince of Wales, and his open and secret abettors...
Page 393 - Clinton, full power and authority to order and appoint fairs, marts, and markets, as also such and so many ports, harbours, bays, havens, and other places for the convenience and security of shipping and for the better loading and unloading of goods and merchandises as by you, with the advice and consent of our said Council, shall be thought fit and necessary.
Page 129 - free community of settlers, their heirs, and successors, lately arrived from England, and under the protection of the British Government...
Page 239 - Town, the capital of the peninsula, is of considerable extent, and is beautifully situate on an inclined plain at the foot of some hills on which stand the fort and other public buildings that overlook it and the roads, whence there is a delightful prospect of the town, rising in the form of an amphitheatre from the water's edge, above which it is elevated about seventy feet. It is regularly laid out into fine streets, intersected by others parallel with the river and at right angles. The houses,...
Page 392 - An Act for amending, explaining and reducing into one Act of Parliament the Laws relating to the Government of His Majesty's Ships, vessels and forces by Sea...
Page 347 - Macarthy gave up apprenticing, except in particular cases, and adopted the plan of forming them into villages, under such civil superintendence and religious instruction as he could command, keeping the youths and children in schools, or making mechanics of them, neglecting perhaps too much, in his successful attempt to make them orderly and quiet citizens, the equally desirable object of making them industrial agriculturists and growers of exportable produce.
Page 108 - ... self-interest, and who desire nothing so much as their improvement and happiness. ' To conclude, they have established, in a central part of Africa, a colony, which appears to be now provided with adequate means both of defence and subsistence ; which, by the blessing of Providence, may become an emporium of commerce, a school of industry, and a source of knowledge, civilisation, and religious improvement to the inhabitants of that continent ; and which may hereafter repay to Great Britain the...
Page 234 - October"' be struck out, and the words " upon the 29th day of January" be inserted. That in the prayer found in this service for the king and royal family, the words " their royal highnesses George Prince of Wales, the Princess of Wales, and,
Page 346 - Colony, without any superintendence than its general police. Captain Columbine employed them on the Public Works or apprenticed them. Colonel Maxwell, after delivering over to the persons appointed to receive them all the men fit for His Majesty's Service, apprenticed a part of the remainder, and then commenced forming villages with those who could not be disposed of. Sir Charles...
Page 107 - ... even as judicial assessors. They have in some measure retrieved the credit of the British, it may be added, of the Christian name, on the continent of Africa ; and have convinced its inhabitants, that there are Englishmen who are actuated by very different motives from those of self-interest, and who desire nothing so much as their improvement and happiness. To conclude, they have established in a central part of Africa, a colony, which appears to be now provided with adequate means both of defence...

Bibliographic information