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(u). Fancy box making; or
(v). Biscuit making; or
(w). Job dyeing; and also,

(x). A part of a factory or workshop which is a warehouse not used for any inanufacturing process or handicraft, and in which persons are solely employed in polishing, cleaning, wrapping or packing up goods. Provided that the said exception shall not apply

(a). Where persons are employed at home, that is to say, to a private house, room, or place which, though used as a dwelling, is by reason of the work carried on there a factory or workshop within the meaning of this act, and in which neither steam, water, nor other mechanical power is used, and in which the only persons employed are members of the same family dwelling there; or

(6). To a workshop, or part thereof, which is conducted on the system of not employing any child or young person therein.

Part IV-Additional Half Hour.

The exception with respect to the employment of a child, young person or woman for a further period of thirty minutes, where the process is in an incomplete state, applies to the factories following; that is to say,

(a). Bleaching and dyeing works;
(6). Print works ;

(c). Iron mills in which male young persons are not employed during any part of the night;

(a). Foundries in which male young persons are not employed during any part of the night; and

(c) Paper mills in which male young persons are not employed during any part of the night.

Part 1 - Overtime for Perishable Articles.

The exception with respect to the employment of women for ninety-six days in any twelve months during a period of employment beginning at six or seven o'clock in the morning and ending at eight or nine o'clock in the evening, applies to a factory or work. shop, or part thereof in which any of the following processes is carried on; namely

The process of making preserves from fruit,
The process of preserving or curing fish, or
The process of making condensed milk.

Part VINight Work.

The exception with respect to the employment of male young persons during the night applies to the factories following ; that is

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The exception respecting the continuous employment in certain textile factories during the winter months of children, young persons and women without an interval of at least half an hour for a meal for the same period as in a non-textile factory, applies to textile factories solely used for

(a). The making of elastic web; or
(6). The making of ribbon; or
(c). The making of trimming.

FOURTH SCHEDULE.

LIST OF FACTORIES AND WORKSHOPS.

Part Non-Textile Factories.

(1). “Print Works,” that is to say, any premises in which any persons are employed to print figures, patterns or designs upon any cotton, linen, woolen, worsted or silken yarn, or upon any woven or felted fabric not being paper;

(2). “Bleaching and dyeing works,” that is to say, any premises in which the processes of bleaching, beetling, dyeing, calendering, finishing, hooking, lapping, and making up and packing any yarn or cloth of any material, or the dressing or finishing of lace, or any one or more of such processes, or any process incidental thereto, are or is carried on;

(3). “Earthenware works,” that is to say, any place in which persons work for hire in making, or assisting in making, finishing or assisting in finishing earthenware of any description, except bricks and tiles not being ornamental tiles;

(4). "Lucifer match works," that is to say, any place in which persons work for hire in making lucifer matches, or in mixing the chemical materials for making them, or in any process incidental to making lucifer matches, except the cutting of the wood;

(5). “Percussion cap works,” that is to say, any place in which persons work for hire in making percussion caps, or in mixing or storing the chemical materials for making them, or in any process incidental to making percussion caps;

(6). "Cartridge works,” that is to say, any place in which persons work for hire in making cartridges, or in any process incidental to making cartridges, except the manufacture of paper or other material that is used in making the cases of the cartridges ;

(7). “Paper staining works,” that is to say, any place in which persons work for hire in printing a pattern in colors upon sheets of paper, either by blocks applied by hand or by roller worked by steam, water, or other mechanical power;

(8). “Fustian cutting works," that is to say, any place in which persons work for hire in fustian cutting;

(9). "Blast furnaces," that is to say, any blast furnace or other furnace, or premises in or on which the process of smelting or otherwise obtaining any metals from the ore is carried on;

(10). "Copper mills;"

(u). “Iron mills,” that is to say, any mill, forge, or other premises in or on which any process is carried on for converting into malleable iron, steel or tin plate, or for otherwise making or converting steel;

(12). “Foundries,” that is to say, iron foundries, copper foundries, brass foundries and other premises or places in which the

process of founding or casting any metal is carried on; except any premises or places in which such process is carried on by not more than five persons and as subsidiary to the repair and completion of some other work;

(13). "Metal and india rubber work," that is to say, any premises in which steam, water, or other mechanical power is used for moving machinery employed in the manufacture of machinery, or in the manufacture of any article of metal not being machinery, or in the manufacture of india rubber or gutta percha, or of articles made wholly or partially of india rubber or gutta percha ;

(14). “ Paper mills,” that is to say, any premises in which the manufacture of paper is carried on;

(15). “Glass works,” that is to say, any premises in which the manufacture of glass is carried on;

(16). “Tobacco factories,” that is to say, any premises in which the manufacture of tobacco is carried on;

(17). “Letter press printing works "; that is to say, any premises in which the process of letter-press printing is carried on;

(18). “Bookbinding works,” that is to say, any premises in which the process of bookbinding is carried on;

(19). "Flax scutch mills.”

Part 11-Non-Textile Factories and Worhshops.

(20). Hat works” that is say, any premises in which the manufacture of hats or any process incidental to their manufacture is carried on;

(21). “Rope works,” that is to say, any premises being a ropery, ropewalk, or ropework, in which is carried on the laying or twisting or other process of preparing or finishing the lines, twines, cords, or ropes, and in which machinery moved by steam, water or other mechanical power is not used for drawing or spinning the fibre of flax, hemp, jute or tow, and which has no internal communication with any buildings or premises joining or forming part of a textile factory, except such communication as is necessary for the transmission of power;

(22). “Bakehouses," that is to say, any places in which are

baked bread, biscuits, or confectionery, from the baking or selling of which a profit is derived;

(23). “ Lace warehouses,” that is to say, any premises, room, or place not included in bleaching and dyeing works as hereinbefore defined, in which persons are employed upon any manufacturing process or handicraft in relation to lace, subsequent to the making of lace upon a lace machine moved by steam, water or other mechanical power ;

(24). "Shipbuilding yards," that is to say, any premises in which any ships, boats, or vessels used in navigation are made, finished, or repaired;

(25). “Quarries,” that is to say, any place, not being a mine, in which persons work in getting slate, stone, copolites, or other minerals;

(26). “ Pit banks,” that is to say, any place above ground adjacent to a shaft of a mine, in which place the employment of women is not regulated by the "Coal Miners' Regulation Act, 1872," or the “Metalliferous Act, 1872," whether such place does or does not form part of the mines within the meaning of these acts.

FIFTH SCHEDULE.

Special Exemption.

Straw plaiting
Pillow-lace making.
Glove making.

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