Steam Navigation, Its Rise and Progress, with Authentic Tables of the Extent of the Steam Marine of All Parts of the Globe, Contrasted with the Steam Power of the British Empire: Imperfections of the Present System of Steam Navigation, and Symington's Inventions ...

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A.H. Baily & Company, 1840 - 173 pages
 

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Page 82 - He had infinite quickness of apprehension, a prodigious memory, and a certain rectifying and methodising power of understanding, which extracted something precious out of all that was presented to it. His stores of miscellaneous knowledge were immense, — and yet less astonishing than the command he had at all times over them.
Page 131 - The boat was again put in motion. She continued to move on. All were still incredulous. None seemed willing to trust the evidence of their own senses. We left the fair city of New York ; we passed through the romantic and ever-varying scenery of the Highlands ; we descried the clustering houses of Albany ; we reached its shores...
Page 85 - THOSE WHO BEST DESERVE THEIR GRATITUDE, THE KING HIS MINISTERS, AND MANY OF THE NOBLES AND COMMONERS OF THE REALM RAISED THIS MONUMENT TO JAMES WATT, WHO DIRECTING THE FORCE OF AN ORIGINAL GENIUS, EARLY EXERCISED IN PHILOSOPHIC RESEARCH TO THE IMPROVEMENT OF THE...
Page 82 - ... the conversation, he rarely suggested the topics on which it was to turn, but readily and quietly took up whatever was presented by those around...
Page 130 - As I had occasion to pass daily to and from the building yard, while my boat was in progress, I have often loitered unknown near the idle groups of strangers, gathering in little circles, and heard various inquiries as to the object of this new vehicle. The language was uniformly that of scorn, or sneer, or ridicule.
Page 82 - Independently of his great attainments in mechanics, Mr. Watt was an extraordinary, and, in many respects, a wonderful man. Perhaps no individual in his age possessed so much and such varied and exact information, had read so much, or remembered what he had read so accurately and well. He had infinite quickness of apprehension, a prodigious memory, and a certain rectifying and methodising power of understanding, which extracted something precious out of all that was presented to it.
Page 130 - They were silent, and sad, and weary. I read in their looks nothing but disaster, and almost repented of my efforts. — The signal was given, and the boat moved on a short distance, and then stopped, and became immoveable.
Page 81 - ... the old man had studied political economy and belles-lettres all his life, — of science it is unnecessary to speak, it was his own distinguished walk. And yet, Captain Clutterbuck, when he spoke with your countryman Jedediah Cleishbotham, you would have sworn he had been coeval with Claver'se and Burley, with the persecutors and persecuted, and could number every shot the dragoons had fired at the fugitive Covenanters. In fact, we discovered that no novel of the least celebrity escaped his...
Page 85 - TO HONOUR THOSE WHO BEST DESERVE THEIR GRATITUDE, THE KING HIS MINISTERS, AND MANY OF THE NOBLES AND COMMONERS OF THE REALM RAISED THIS MONUMENT TO JAMES WATT, WHO DIRECTING THE FORCE OF AN ORIGINAL GENIUS, EARLY EXERCISED IN...
Page 80 - This potent commander of the elements — this abridger of time and space — this magician, whose cloudy machinery has produced a change on the world, the effects of which, extraordinary as they are, are perhaps only now beginning to be felt — was not only the most profound man of science, the most successful combiner of powers and calculator of numbers as adapted to practical purposes, — was not only one of the most generally well-informed, — but one of the best and kindest of human beings.

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