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The Chariot now the painful fteep afcends, The Paans ceafe; thy glorious labour ends. Here fix'd, the bright eternal Temple stands, Its profpect an unbounded view commands: Say, wondrous youth, what Column wilt thou chufe, What laurel'd Arch for thy triumphant Muse? Though each great Ancient court thee to his shrine, Though every Laurel through the dome be thine, (From the proud Epic, down to those that shade The gentler brow of the soft Lesbian maid) Go to the Good and Juft, an awful train, Thy foul's delight, and glory of the Fane: While through the earth thy dear remembrance flies, "Sweet to the world, and grateful to the skies.”

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SIMON HARCOURT.

[The verses to Mr. Pope, by the Duke of Buckingham, Dr. Parnell, Mr. Broome, Mr. Fenton, and Lord Lyttelton, are inferted among the Poems of their refpective Authors.]

PRE

THE

POEM S

OF

ALEXANDER POPE, Esq.

WITH HIS LAST

CORRECTIONS, ADDITIONS, and

IMPROVEMENTS.

Printed verbatim from the Octavo Edition

O F

MR. WARBURTON.

VOLI.

"HORACE avec BOILEAU;

« Vous y cherchiez le vrai, vous y goutiez le beau'; "Quelques traits échappés d'une utile morale, "Dans leurs piquans écrits brillent par intervale. "Mais Pope approfondit ce q'ils ont effleuré ; "D'un efprit plus hardi, d'un pas plus affuré, "Il porta le flambeau dans l'abîme de l'Etre, "Et l'homme avec lui feul apprit à fe connoitre. "L'art quelquefois frivole et quelquefois divin,

L'art des vers eft dans POPE UTILE AU GENRE "HUMAIN."

VOLTAIRE, au Roi de Pruffe.

I

PREFACE.

AM inclined to think, that both the writers of books and the readers of them are generally not a little unreasonable in their expectations. The firft seem to fancy that the world must approve of whatever they produce, and the latter to imagine that authors are obliged to please them at any rate. Methinks, as on the one hand, no fingle man is born with a right of controling the opinions of all the reft; fo on the other, the world has no title to demand, that the whole care and time of any particular perfon fhould be facrificed to its entertainment. Therefore I cannot but believe that writers and readers are under equal obligations, for as much fame, or pleasure, as each affords the other.

Every one acknowledges, it would be a wild notion to expect perfection in any work of man: and yet one would think the contrary was taken for granted, by the judgment commonly paffed upon Poems. A Critic fuppofes he has done his part, if he proves a writer to have failed in an expreffion, or erred in any particular point and can it then be wondered at, if the Poets, in general, feem refolved not to own themselves in any error? For as long as one fide will make no allowances, the other will be brought to no acknowledgments

:

I am

* In the former editions it was thus" For as long 86 as one fide defpifes a well-meant endeavour, the other "will not be fatisfied with a moderate approbation."

But

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