Lucretia; or, The children of night, by the author of 'Rienzi'.

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 23 - Di, quibus imperium est animarum, umbraeque silentes, et Chaos et Phlegethon, loca nocte tacentia late, 265 sit mihi fas audita loqui, sit numine vestro pandere res alta terra et caligine mersas.
Page 17 - That power derives all its sublimity from the terror with which it is generally accompanied, will appear evidently from its effect in the very few cases in which it may be possible to strip a considerable degree of strength of its ability to hurt. When you do this, you spoil it of every thing sublime, and it immediately becomes contemptible.
Page 56 - Of feeling, little more can be said than that the idea of bodily pain, in all the modes and degrees of labor, pain, anguish, torment, is productive of the sublime ; and nothing else in this sense can produce it.
Page 57 - Thus, and no farther, let my passion stray : The first crime past compels us on to more, And guilt proves fate, which was but choice before.
Page 17 - Amongst these we never look for the sublime: it comes upon us in the gloomy forest, and in the howling wilderness, in the form of the lion, the tiger, the panther, or rhinoceros.
Page 7 - If this were a true representation of the scheme of Don Quixote, we cannot wonder that some persons should, as M. Sismondi tells us they do, consider it as the most melancholy book that has ever been written. They consider it also, no doubt, one of the most immoral, as chilling and pernicious in its influence on the social converse of mankind, as the Prince of Machiavel is on their political intercourse. 'Cervantes,' he proceeds, ' has shown us in some measure the vanity of greatness of soul and...
Page 16 - Whatever is fitted in any sort to excite the ideas of pain and danger, that is to say, whatever is in any sort terrible, or is conversant about terrible objects, or operates in a manner analogous to terror, is a source of the sublime; that is, it is productive of the strongest emotion which the mind is capable of feeling.
Page 30 - ... the great or to those of the mean. It is the treatment that ennobles, not the subject. Grant that the characters are what convention calls low — in birth, station, instruction ; born in a cellar, dying on the gibbet, they are not one jot, for those reasons, made necessarily low to art. Art can, with Fielding, weave an epic from adventures with gamekeepers and barbers. Art can, with Goethe, convert into poetry the most lofty, the homely image of the girl condemned for infanticide, and confine...
Page 49 - Distinguishable in member, joint, or limb; Or substance may be called that shadow seems, For each seems either ; black it stands as night, Fierce as ten furies, terrible as hell, And shakes a dreadful dart; and what seems its head The likeness of a kingly crown has on.
Page 34 - First, to draw attention to two errors in our penal institutions, viz. a vicious Prison-discipline and a sanguinary Criminal Code, — the habit of corrupting the boy by the very punishment that ought to redeem him, and then hanging the man, at the first occasion, as the easiest way of getting rid of our own blunders.

Bibliographic information