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cidedly of a higher order. He also excelled Abu) Fazil in the graces of his person, having inherited from his mother (a Hindoo slave of surpassing love. liness) a figure of exquisite grace and symmetry, and features of most faultless and noble beauty.

Thus fitted by nature and prepared by art for the part he was to perform, this youth was secretly Bent to Allahabad, where the deputies of the Brahmans rested for some days on their return to the Sacred City. Here Abul Fazil, with great appearance of mystery and circumspection, introduced himself to the chief priest, Sarma, and presented to him his youthful brother as the orphan son of the Brahman Mitra, a celebrated teacher of astronomy in the court of the late sultan. Abul Fazil had artfully prepared such documents, as left no doubt of the truth of his story. His pupil in treachery played his part to admiration, and the deception was complete and successful.

" It was the will of the Great King,” said the wily Abul Fazil, “ that this fair youth should be brought up in his palace, and converted to the Moslem faith ; but, bound by my vows to a dying friend, I have for fourteen years eluded the command of the sultan, and in placing him under thy protection, O most venerable Sarma! I have at length discharged my conscience, and fulfilled the last wishes of the Brahman Mitra. Peace be with him! If it seem good in thy sight, let this remain for ever a secret between me and thee. I have successfully thrown dust in the eyes of the sultan,

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and caused it to be announce of a sudden and ran on Surpuis 19. list cover, that be has seen muss dist the truth reab lis sing sa 121 Vue E. IL Fazil would asi 2 iriur 1 12 obedience."

The old Brabcevi 1121) vipmaye of gratitude and istit Tinger.rnat si'r ansuspicion of the musi etirs wants youth with 5. Be rris, un og vips some months ever Let arra, 1171 as his son, 4 De in tl vanie Trening for nisteka * the Beloved ones Counter 18 ta Indian women were ut earu *ib bory dol, the cod C-12:2

Govinda, so en uya! 111 *** study the same! aut15 grippe avion des Brahmans as it is an in 1** **

ده مو به مدرسه 1 و تة ل لگا کر Sastas I

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cidedly of a higher order. He also excelled Abu) Fazil in the graces of his person, having inherited from his mother (a Hindoo slave of surpassing loveliness) a figure of exquisite grace and symmetry, and features of most faultless and noble beauty.

Thus fitted by nature and prepared by art for the part he was to perform, this youth was secretly sent to Allahabad, where the deputies of the Bralmans rested for some days on their return to the Sacred City. Here Abul Fazil, with great appearance of mystery and circumspection, introduced himself to the chief priest, Sarma, and presented to him his youthful brother as the orphan son of the Brahman Mitra, a celebrated teacher of astronomy in the court of the late sultan. Abul Fazil had artfully prepared such documents, as left no doubt of the truth of his story. His pupil in treachery played his part to admiration, and the deception was complete and successful.

“ It was the will of the Great King," said the wily Abul Fazil, “ that this fair youth should be brought up in his palace, and converted to the Moslem faith ; but, bound by my vows to a dying friend, I have for fourteen years eluded the command of the sultan, and in placing him under thy protection, O most venerable Sarma! I have at length discharged my conscience, and fulfilled the last wishes of the Brahman Mitra. Peace be with him! If it seem good in thy sight, let this remain for ever a secret between me and thee. I have successfully thrown dust in the eyes of the sultan,

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and caused it to be reported, that the youth is dead of a sudden and grievous disease. Should he discover, that he has been deceived by his slave; should the truth reach his mighty ears, the head of Abu) Fazil would assuredly pay the forfeit of his disa obedience.”

The old Brahman replied with many expressions of gratitude and inviolable discretion; and, wholly unsuspicious of the cruel artifice, received the youth with joy. He carried him to Benares, where some months afterwards he publicly adopted him as his son, and gave him the name of Govinda, w the Beloved,” one of the titles under which the Indian women adore their beautiful and favorite dol, the god Crishna.

Govinda, so we must now call him, was set to study the sacred language, and the theology of the Brahmans as it is revealed in their Vedas and Sastras. In both he made quick and extraordiDary progress; and his singular talents did not more endear him to his preceptor, than his dociljy, and the pensive, and even melancholy sweeta ess of his temper and manner. His new duties vere not unpleasing or unsuited to one of his indolent and contemplative temper. He possibly folt, at first, a holy horror at the pagan sacrifices, in which he was obliged to assist, and some reluctince to feeding consecrated cows, gathering flowers, sooking rice, and drawing water for offerings and libations; but by degrees he reconciled his conscience to these occupations, and became attached to his Gooroc, and interested in his philosophical studies. He would have been happy, in short, but for certain uneasy sensations of fear and selfreproach, which he vainly endeavored to forget or to reason down.

Abul Fazil, who dreaded not his indiscretion or his treachery, but his natural sense of rectitule, which had yielded reluctantly, even to the come mand of Akbar, maintained a constant intercourse with him by means of an intelligent mute, who, hovering in the vicinity of Benares, sometimes in the disguise of a fisherman, sometimes as a coolie, was a continual spy upon all his movements; and once in every month, when the moon was in her dark quarter, Govinda met him secretly, and exchanged communications with his brother.

The Brahman Sarma was rich; he was proud of his high caste, his spiritual office, and his learning; he was of the tribe of Narayna, which for a thousand years had filled the offices of priesthoord, without descending to any meaner occupation, or mingling blood with any inferior caste. He maintained habitually a cold, austere, and dignified calmness of demeanor; and flattered himself, that he had attained that state of perfect indifference to all worldly things, which, according to the Brahminical philosophy, is the highest point of human virtue ; but, though simple, grave, and austere in his personal habits, he lived with a splendor be. coming his reputation, his high rank, and vast pose sessions. He exercised an almost princely hospi

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