Page images
PDF
EPUB

RETURN to an Order of the Honourable The House of Commons,

dated 20 July 1863 ;--- fur,

RETURNS “ of the Names of the OFFICERS and Number of the SEAMEN and

Marines detached from Her Majesty's Ship ‘ ENCOUNTER,' at Ningpo, who were engaged in the several ATTACKS upon Showshing, and by whose Orders :”

And, of the OFFICERS, Seamen, and MARINES who have been Killed, Wounded, or Died from Disease while employed on Shore from Her MAJESTY'S Ships in the China Seas, from the Year 1860, inclusive, to the latest Dates; distinguishing the Ships and Places where the Casualties occurred.”

Admiralty, 1 27 July 1863.

}

J. H. JESSE,

For the Chief Clerk.

(Colonel Sykes.)

Ordered, by The House of Commons, to be Printed,

27 July 1863.

RETURNS of the Names of the OFFICERS and Number of the SEAMEN and MARINES

detached from Her Majesty's Ship“ ENCOUNTER,” at Ningpo, who were engaged in the several ATTACKS upon Showshing, and by whose Orders :-And, of the OFFICERS, SEAMEN, and MARINES who have been Killed, Wounded, or Died from Disease while employed on Shore from HER MAJESTY's Ships in the CHINA SEAS, from the Year 1860, inclusive, to the latest Dates ; distinguishing the Ships and Places where the Casualties occurred.

No Return in Office of the Names of the Officers and Number of the Seamen and

were engaged

Marines detached from Her Majesty's Ship “ Encounter,” at Ningpo, wh in the several Attacks upon Showshing.

Admiralty, 7 27 July 1863. s

J. H. Jesse,

For the Chief Clerk.

RETURN of the Names of the OFFICERS and Number of the SEAMEN and MARINES

who have been Killed, Wounded, or Died from Disease while employed on Shore from HER MAJESTY'S Ships in the China Seas, from the year 1860, inclusive, to the latest Dates; distinguishing the Ships and Places where the Casualties occurred.

[blocks in formation]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]
[blocks in formation]

RETURN to an Order of the Honourable The House of Commons,

dated 17 February 1863 ;-for,

COPIES “of LETTERS to the Honourable Sir, M. F. F. Berkeley, dated

Liverpool, the 23d day of June 1854:” • Of the Date when Wm. Carpmael was first employed by the Admiralty, and

a Statement of the Instructions and Remuneration he received :" And, DETAILED ACCOUNT of the Costs incurred by the ADMIRALTY, in

the recent TRIAL of Clare v. The Queen."

[ocr errors]

Admiralty, I 19 March 1863.)

C. H. PENNELL,

Chief Clerk.

(.1.) To the Right Honourable M. F. F. Berkeley, M.P., First Commissioner of the

Admiralty.

21, Exchange Buildings, Liverpool, Sir,

23 June 1854. This day is forwarded per railway, carriage paid, to your address at the Admiralty, a small box, containing models relating to improvements in ship building, in conformity with Patent No. 2042, and Patent 2662 relates to the machinery for rolling and forming metal for ship-building purposes.

The entire frame being made of T iron, both longitudinally and vertically, will possess sufficient strength in itself though covered with only light plates, to enable a vessel of large tonnage to carry a heavy cargo without straining, and to resist the effects of heavy weather to an astonishing extent, then the plates when tolerably light, but having either single or double flanges or ribs on them, must obtain great strength at the top and bottom.

The first thickness of planking is of teak, which, from the oleaginous nature of that description of timber, will preserve the iron from oxydation; this bolted downward through the flanges, also through the vertical framing, becomes one solid mass, and the frame not having joints like a timber-built ship's, must unquestionably give great stability; then a layer of cork put on the teak and diagonal planking or sheathing over that, secured with wood, screws, or nails, and in some places bolted right through to the longitudinal framing, secured through vertical framing, with copper bolts, or screwed to the inner planking of teak. The joints all through may be caulked or not, and felt placed on the outside of the planking, coppered. The thickness of planking, cork, &c., and the number of layers of cork must be regulated according to the amount of power of resistance to shot required.

The inside may be either ceiled with timber, or diagonally laid with T iron. The flanges of the plates at the joints may be rivetted together longitudinally, and the sides rivetted through the vertical framing, or a longitudinal and vertical framing T iron, the plates jump jointed with the flanges on the outside of the plates for the timber, &c., &c.

There are various methods of carrying out this method of ship building; of course it must resolve itself into a question between the expense of this mode and its enhanced efficiency and seryiceableness as regards the superior resistance to shot, and much greater facilities for plugging, in case of a shot going through the vessel's side.

I have, &c. (signed) John Clare, Junior.

« EelmineJätka »