Brahman: A Comparative Theology

Front Cover
Psychology Press, 2001 - 268 pages
This book is a critique of western systematic theology. It borrows insights from India and other traditions; it is not a synthesis of religious traditions. The book includes two parts, method and systematics. It examines the traditional topics of systematic theology '- topics such as the existence and nature of God, revelation and reason, religious ethics and human practice, the relation of God to the world, Christology, and eschatology - and allows these topics to grow in conversation with India and to change according to dialogical insights. The book is prompted by a perceived need to cross the boundaries between western and Indian worldviews in a systematic and comprehensive way. The purpose of the book is to enable scholars worldwide to extend their theological resources and to look anew at the problems and prospects of a comparative, systematic theology.

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Contents

Chapter One Introduction
1
Definitions of Brahman
2
The Method of Borrowing Insights from Other Traditions
3
Scholarly Resources for the Comparative Theologian
4
A Synopsis of the Argument
6
Onedimensional Twodimensional or Holistic?
15
A Model of Theological Inquiry
19
Perception
25
Vedic Henotheism and the Religious Ideal
62
Locus and Material of the Sacrifice
66
Self and SelfSacrifice
70
Self and Community
73
Eschatology from Veda to Vedānta
78
Revelation Through Sacred Text
91
Chapter Five Is Brahman God?
124
Cosmic Order and the Problem of Evil
172

Experience
31
Sacred Text
34
The Method of Correlation
38
YinYang or Correlative Thinking
41
Summary Defense of the Holistic Method
48
Chapter Three Vedic Holism and Theology
53
Vedic Holism
57
Chapter Seven Humanity Comparative Christology
216
The Buddhist Worldview
223
The Ideal of the Avatāra
234
Christologies of Wisdom
240
Krsna and Christ
250
Index of Scriptural References
259
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Michael W. Myers is Associate Professor of Philosophy and Coordinator of the Religious Studies Program at Washington State University.

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