The Lives of the Poets of Great Britain and Ireland: To the Time of Dean Swift, 5. köide

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R. Griffiths, 1753 - 358 pages

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Page 65 - This relation will not be wholly without its use if those who languish under any part of his sufferings shall be enabled to fortify their patience by reflecting that they feel only those afflictions from which the abilities of Savage did not exempt him ; or...
Page 188 - I care not, Fortune, what you me deny : You cannot rob me of free Nature's grace ; You cannot shut the windows of the sky, Through which Aurora shows her brightening face; You cannot bar my constant feet to trace The woods and lawns, by living stream, at eve...
Page 214 - Who but must laugh if such a man there be ? Who would not weep if Atticus were he?
Page 209 - How loved, how honoured once, avails thee not To whom related, or by whom begot; A heap of dust alone remains of thee : 'Tis all thou art, and all the proud shall be!
Page 182 - Dare not th' infectious sigh ; the pleading look, Downcast, and low, in meek submission drest, But full of guile. Let not the fervent tongue, Prompt to deceive, with adulation smooth, Gain on your purpos'd will. Nor in the bower, Where woodbines flaunt, and roses shed a couch, While evening draws her crimson curtains round, Trust your soft minutes with betraying man. And let th...
Page 213 - Damn with faint praise, assent with civil leer, And without sneering, teach the rest to sneer; Willing to wound and yet afraid to strike, Just hint a fault and hesitate dislike; Alike...
Page 272 - O'er whose unhappy waters, void of light, No bird presumes to steer his airy flight : Such deadly stenches from the depth arise, And steaming sulphur, that infects the skies. From hence, the Grecian bards their legends make, And give the name Avernus, to the lake.
Page 163 - I cannot conclude this book upon the creation without mentioning a poem which has lately appeared under that title.* The work was undertaken with so good an intention, and is executed with so great a mastery, that it deserves to be looked upon as one of the most useful and noble productions in our English verse. The reader cannot but be pleased...
Page 21 - We have, it seems, a Great Turk in poetry, who can never bear a brother on the throne...
Page 195 - Where never human foot had mark'd the shore, These ruffians left me — Yet believe me, Areas, Such is the rooted love we bear mankind, All ruffians as they were, I never heard A sound so dismal as their parting oars.

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