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Inflammable Oils Act.—1908.

PART VIII.

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(j) Regulating the mode of stowing and keeping inflammable

oil during transit, and of giving notice by brands, labels, or otherwise of the nature and destination of any

package of inflammable oil: (k) Regulating the hawking of inflammable oil: (1) Regulating the use of fires and lights on or near any ships,

boats, or carriages loading or unloading inflammable oil, or in which inflammable oil is being or has been recently conveyed, and prohibiting the use of such fires

or lights thereon or near thereto as may be dangerous : (m) Regulating the placing, removal, and storage of inflammable

oil on or from any wharf and any place within two

hundred yards of any wharf: (n) Regulating the conveyance, loading, and unloadiag of

inflammable oil: Altering or adding to the Schedule to this Act pre

scribing the manner of testing inflammable oil and the construction of test apparatus: Provided that the standard model of any apparatus made in pursuance of such regulations deposited with the Government Analyst shall be so constructed as to give flash points corresponding to those given by the apparatus

prescribed in the Schedule: (P) Prescribing fees to be paid for testing inflammable oil, for

testing, stamping, and marking apparatus, and for any other work done for the purpose of carrying out any of

the provisions of this Act : (9) Prescribing penalties not exceeding Fifty Pounds for any

one offence for any contravention of any regulation.

Publication and disallowance of regulations and rules.

50. All regulations made shall

(a) Be published in the Gazette;
(6) Take effect from the date of publication, or from a later

date to be specified therein; and
(c) Be laid before both Houses of Parliament within fourteen days

after publication, if Parliament is in Session, at the end of such fourteen days, and if not, then within fourteen days after the commencement of the next Session ; but it either House of Parliament passes a resolution at any time within thirty days after such regulations have been laid before such House, disallowing any such regulation, such rule or regulation shall thereupon cease to have effect. Provided that if Parliament shall not be in Session for thirty days after such regulations shall have been laid before it then no regulation shall continue to have any force or effect if disapproved by either House of Parliament within thirty days after the commencement of the next Session of Parliament.

51. (1) Any

Inflammable Oils Act.—1908.

51. (1) Any person desiring to dispute the validity of a regula. ParT vili. tion may apply to the Supreme Court, upon affidavit, for a rule Testing validity of calling upon the Chief Inspector to show cause why such regulation reg should not be quashed, either wholly or in part, for the illegality thereof.

(2) The said Court may make absolute or discharge the said rule, with or without costs.

(3) All regulations, unless and until so quashed, shall have the same effect as if enacted in this Act.

(4) No regulation shall be challenged or disputed in any other manner.

In the name and on behalf of His Majesty, I hereby assent to this Bill.

GEORGE R. LE HUNTE, Governor.

SCHEDULE

Inflammable Oils Ad.—1908.

SCHEDULE

N.B.--In this Schedule the expression "oil" means any liquid to be tested for the purpose of ascer.

taining its character as inflammable oil. Degrees of temperature are according to Fahrenheit's thermometer.

1.Nature of the Test Apparatus. The apparatus consists of the following parts :

1. An oil cup. 2. A corer, with slide, test lamp for oil, or test-flame arrangement for use with

gas, and clockwork arrangement for opening and closing the holes in the

cover, and for dipping the test flame. 3. A water bath or heating vessel. 4. A tripod (with jacket), and spirit lamp or gas arrangement for heating the

water bath. 5. A round bulb thermometer for testing the temperature of the oil, with scale

ranging from 55° Fahrenheit to 160° Fahrenheit. 6. A long bulb thermometer for testing the temperature of the water, with scale

ranging from 90° Fahrenheit to 220° Fahrenheit. 7. A mercurial or aneroid barometer.

The oil cup is a cylindrical flat-bottomed vessel, 2 inches in diameter, 2- inches in height (internal), made of gunmetal or brass (17 B.W.G.), and tinned or silvered inside. It is provided with a projecting rim, i inch wide, ş inch from the top, and 13 inch from the bottom of the cup, on which it rests when inserted in the water bath. A gauge is fixed on the inside of the cup to regulate the height to which it is to be filled with the sample under examination. The distance of the point from the bottom of the cup is 1} inch. The cup is provided with a close-fitting orerlapping cover, made of brass (22 B.W.G.), which carries the thermometer, the test lamp, or test-flame arrangement, and the adjuncts thereto. The test lamp, which has a spout, the mouth of which is it incb in diameter, or test-flame arrangement, is suspended upon two supports by means of trunnions, which allow it to be easily inclined to a particular angle and restored to its original position. The socket in the cover, which is to hold a round bulb thermometer for indicating the temperature of the oil during the testing operation, is so adjusted that the bulb of the latter is always inserted to distance of 13 inch below the centre of the lid.

The cover is provided with three holes-one in the centre (0.2 square inch) and two smaller ones (each 0.06 square inch) close to the sides. These are closed and opened by means of a pivoted slide. When the slide is moved so as to uncover the holes, the suspended lamp, or test-flame arrangement, is caught by a projection fixed on the slide, and tilted in such a way as to bring the end of the spout or test flame just below the surface of the lid. As the slide moves back so as to cover the holes the lamp returns to its original position. Upon the cover, in front of and in a line with the nozzle of the lamp, is fixed a white bead, the diameter of which represents the size of the test flame to be used.

The water bath or heating vessel consists of two flat-bottomed copper cylinders (24 B.W.G.)-an inner one of 3 inches diameter and 24 inches height, and an outer one of 5} inches diameter and 54 inches height; they are soldered to a circular copper plate (20 B.W.G.) perforated in the centre, which forms the top of the bath, in such manner as to inclose the space between the two cylinders, but leaving access to the inner cylinder. The top of the bath projects both outwards and inwards about inch, that is, its diameter is about 8 inch greater than the body of bath, while the diameter of the circular opening in the centre is about the same amount less than that of the inner copper cylinder. To the inner projection of the top is fastened, by six small screws, a flat ring of ebonite, the screws being sunk below the surface of the ebonite to avoid metallic contact between the bath and the oil cup. The exact distance between the sides and bottom of the bath and the oil cup is inch. The bath is therefore so constructed that when the oil cup is placed in position an air space or air chamber intervenes between the two; consequently, in applying the test to oils flashing below 115° Fahrenheit the heat is transmitted gradually to the oil from the hot water, through

the

Inflammable Oils Act.—-1908.

the air space. The water bath is fitted with a socket, set at a right angle, for receiving a long bulb thermometer, to indicate the temperature of the water. It is also provided with a funnel, an overflow pipe, and two handles.

The water bath rests upon a tripod stand, which is fitted with a copper cylinder or jacket (24 B.W.G) 6inches diameter, so that the bath is surrounded by an enclosed air space, which retains and regulates the heat. One of the legs of the stand serves as a support for a spirit lamp, which is attached to it by a small swing bracket. The distance of the wick holder from the bottom of the bath is 1 inch. The clockwork arrangement by which, during the operation of testing, the slide is withdrawn and the test flame dipped into the cup and raised again as the slide is replaced is provided with a ratchet key for setting it in action for each test, and with a trigger for starting it each time that the test flame is applied. From the beginning to the end of the movement of the slide the time taken is to be exactly 3 seconds.

11.Directions for Preparing and Using the Test Apparatus.

1. Preparing the Water Bath. The water bath is filled by pouring water into the funnel until it begins to flow out at the overflow pipe. The temperature of the water at the commencement of each test, as indicated by the long bulb thermometer, is to be as follows:(a) 130° Fahrenheit when a flashing point at or about 73° Fahrenheit is to be

observed : (6) 160° Fahrenheit when a flashing point at or about 100° Fahrenheit is to be

observed : (c) 180° Fahrenheit when a flashing point at or about 150° Fahrenheit is to be

observed. This is attained in the first instance by mixing hot and cold water, either in the bath or in a vessel from which the bath is filled, until the thermometer which is provided for testing the temperature of the water gives the proper indication, or the water is heated in the bath by means of a spirit lamp or gas arrangement until the required temperature is indicated.

2. Preparing the Test Lamp. (a) The test lamp is fitted with a piece of cylindrical wick of such thickness that it fills the wick holder, but may be readily moved to and fro for the purpose of adjusting the size of the flame. In the body of the lamp, upon the wick which is coiled within it, is placed a small tuft of cotton wool moistened with petroleum, any oil not absorbed by the wool being removed. When the lamp has been lighted the wick is adjusted by means of a pair of forceps or a pin until the flame is of the size of the bead fixed on the cover of the oil cup.

Should a particular test occupy so long a time that the flame begins to get smaller through the supply of the oil in the lamp becoming exhausted, three or four drops of petroleum are allowed to fall upon the tuft of wool in the lamp from a dropping. bottle or pipette provided for the purpose. This can be safely done without interrupting the test.

(6) When using gas for testing, the jet is to be lighted and then adjusted by means of the tap controlled by means of a screw pinch cock or fine tap until the flame is the size of the bead fixed on the cover of the oil cup.

111.Filling the Oil Cup. Before the oil cup is filled the lid is to be made ready by being placed upon the cup, i.e., the round bulb thermometer is to be inserted into the socket, so that the projecting rim of the collar with which it is fitted touches the edge of the socket, and the test lamp is to be placed in position. The oil cup is to be cooled when necessary to a temperature not exceeding(a) 60° Fahrenheit, when a flashing point at or about 73° Fahrenheit is being

observed : (6) 85° Fahrenheit, when a flashing point at or about 100° Fahrenheit is being

observed : (c) 135° Fahrenheit, when a flashing point at or about 150° Fahrenheit is being

observed : by placing it bottom downwards in water at a suitable temperature. The oil cup is now to be rapidly wiped dry, placed on a level surface in a good light, and the oil to be tested is poured in without splashing until its surface is level with the point of the gauge which is fitted in the cup. The lid is then put on the cup at once and pressed down so that its edge rests on the rim of the cup.

IV.- Application

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Inflammable Oils Act.—1908. - -- -- - ---- -- --- - - -- -

---- --IV.-- Application of the Test. 1. The water bath, with its thermometer in position, is placed in some locality where it is not exposed to currents of air, and where the light is sufficiently subdued to admit of the size of the entire test flame being compared with that of the bead on the cover. The cup is carefully lifted, without shaking it, and placed in the bath, the test lamp is lighted, and the clockwork wound up by turning the key. The thermometer in the oil cup is now watched, and the clock work is set in motion by pressing the trigger, when the temperature has reached (u) 63° Fahrenheit, when a flashing point at or about 73° Fahrenheit is being

observed : (6) 90° Fahrenheit, when a flashing point at or about 100° Fahrenheit is being

observed : (c) 140° Fahrenheit, when a flashing point at or about 150° Fahrenheit is being

observed : If no flash takes place the clockwork is at once rewound and the trigger pressed at the next higher degree, and so on at every degree rise of temperature until the flash occurs.

2. When a flashing point at or above 115° Fahrenheit is being observed the air chamber is to be filled to a depth of 1šin. with cold water before the oil cup containing the oil to be tested is placed in position.

3. The temperature at which a flash occurs, if not within 8° of the temperature at which the testing was commenced, is the observed flashing point of the oil, and by correction of the observed flashing point for atmospheric pressure as hereinafter described, the true flashing point is obtained.

4. If, however, the flash takes place at any temperature within go of the temperature at which the testing was commenced, the test is to be rejected, and the whole operation of testing is to be repeated with a fresh portion of the sample, the testing, however, to begin at 10° lower than the temperature at which the flash has been previously obtained. If necessary, this procedure shall be repeated with fresh portions of oil until a flash has been obtained at a tenperature not within 80 of the temperature at which the testing was commenced.

5. The temperature at which this last-mentioned flash occurs is the observed flashing point of the oil, and by correction of the observed flashing point for atmospheric pressure as hereinafter described, the true flashing point is obtained.

6. In repeating a test a fresh sample of oil must always be used, the tested sample being thrown away, and the cup must be wiped dry from any adhering oil, and cooled, as already described, before receiving the fresh sample.

7. If in any case no flash has occurred when a temperature has been reached which is not within 8° of the temperature at which the testing was commenced and which, after correction for atmospheric pressure, is not less than 73° Fahrenheit, and the tests are not required to be continued, the oil shall be deemed to have a true flashing point of not less than 73° Fahrenheit.

8. If no flash has occurred when a temperature has been reached which is not within 8° of the temperature at which the testing was commenced and which, after correction for atmospheric pressure, is not less than 100° Fahrenheit, and the tests are not required to be continued, the oil shall be deemed to have a true flashing point of not less than 100° Fahrenheit.

9. In the same manner if no flash has occurred when a temperature has been reached which is not within go of the temperature at which the testing was commenced and which, after correction for atmospheric pressure, is not less than 150° Fahrenheit, and the tests are not required to be continued, the oil shall be deemed to have a true flashing point of not less than 150° Fahrenheit.

V.- Correction for Atmospheric Pressure. As the flashing point of an oil is influenced by changes in atmospheric pressure to an average of 1.6° for every inch of the barometer, a correction of the observed flashing point is necessary whenever the barometer does not stand at 30 inches. This correction is to be made in the following manner :

If the barometer stands at less than 30 inches (the normal height of the barometer) add to the observed flashing point 1.6 times the difference (measured in inches) between the actual and normal barometer. If the barometer stands above 30 inches, deduct from the observed flashing point 1.6 times the difference between the actual and normal barometer.

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