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Inflammable Oils Act. 1908.

the air space. The water bath is fitted with a socket, set at a right angle, for receiving a long bulb thermometer, to indicate the temperature of the water. It is also provided with a funnel, an overflow pipe, and two handles.

The water bath rests upon a tripod stand, which is fitted with a copper cylinder or jacket (24 B.W.G) 64 inches diameter, so that the bath is surrounded by an enclosed air space, which retains and regulates the heat. One of the legs of the stand serves as a support for a spirit lamp, which is attached to it by a small swing bracket. The distance of the wick holder from the bottom of the bath is 1 inch. The clockwork arrangement by which, during the operation of testing, the slide is withdrawn and the test flame dipped into the cup and raised again as the slide is replaced is provided with a ratchet key for setting it in action for each test, and with a trigger for starting it each time that the test flame is applied. From the beginning to the end of the movement of the slide the time taken is to be exactly 3 seconds. 11.Directions for Preparing and Using the Test Apparatus.

1. Preparing the Water Bath. The water bath is filled by pouring water into the funnel until it begins to flow out at the overflow pipe. The temperature of the water at the commencement of each test, as indicated by the long bulb thermometer, is to be as follows:(a) 130° Fahrenheit when a flashing point at or about 73° Fahrenheit is to be

observed : (6) 160° Fahrenheit when a flashing point at or about 100° Fahrenheit is to be

observed : (c) 180° Fahrenheit when a flashing point at or about 150° Fahrenheit is to be

observed. This is attained in the first instance by mixing hot and cold water, either in the bath or in a vessel from which the bath is filled, until the thermometer which is provided for testing the temperature of the water gives the proper indication, or the water is heated in the bath by means of a spirit lamp or gas arrangement until the required temperature is indicated.

2. Preparing the Test Lamp. (a) The test lamp is fitted with a piece of cylindrical wick of such thickness that it fills the wick holder, but may be readily moved to and fro for the purpose of adjusting the size of the flame. In the body of the lamp, upon the wick which is coiled within it, is placed a small tuft of cotton wool moistened with petroleum, any oil not absorbed by the wool being renoved. When the lamp has been lighted the wick is adjusted by means of a pair of forceps or a pin until the flame is of the size of the bead fixed on the cover of the oil cup.

Should a particular test occupy so long a time that the flame begins to get smaller through the supply of the oil in the lamp becoming exhausted, three or four drops of petroleum are allowed to fall upon the tuft of wool in the lamp from a droppingbottle or pipette provided for the purpose. This can be safely done without interrupting the test.

(6) When using gas for testing, the jet is to be lighted and then adjusted by means of the tap controlled by means of a screw pinch cock or fine tap until the flame is the size of the bead fixed on the cover of the oil cup.

111.-Filling the Oil Cup. Before the oil cup is filled the lid is to be made ready by being placed upon the cup, i.e., the round bulb thermometer is to be inserted into the socket, so that the projecting rim of the collar with which it is fitted touches the edge of the socket, and the test lamp is to be placed in position. The oil cup is to be cooled when necessary to a temperature not exceeding(a) 60° Fahrenheit, when a flashing point at or about 73° Fahrenheit is being

observed : (6) 85° Fahrenheit, when a flashing point at or about 100° Fahrenheit is being

observed : (c) 135° Fahrenheit, when a flashing point at or about 150° Fahrenheit is being

observed : by placing it bottom downwards in water at a suitable temperature. The oil cup is now to be rapidly wiped dry, placed on a level surface in a good light, and the oil to be tested is poured in without splashing until its surface is level with the point of the gauge which is fitted in the cup. The lid is then put on the cup at once and pressed down so that its edge rests on the rim of the cup.

IV.-Application Inflammable Oils Act.--1908.

IV.-- Application of the Test. 1. The water bath, with its thermometer in position, is placed in some locality where it is not exposed to currents of air, and where the light is sufficiently subdued to admit of the size of the entire test Aame being compared with that of the bead on the cover. The cup is carefully lifted, without shaking it, and placed in the bath, the test lamp is lighted, and the clockwork wound up by turning the key. The thermometer in the oil cup is now watched, and the clockwork is set in motion by pressing the trigger, when the temperature has reached (u) 63o Fahrenheit, when a flashing point at or about 73° Fahrenheit is being

observed : (6) 90° Fahrenheit, when a flashing point at or about 100° Fahrenheit is being

observed : (c) 140° Fahrenheit, when a flashing point at or about 150° Fahrenheit is being

observed : If no flash takes place the clockwork is at once rewound and the trigger pressed at the next higher degree, and so on at every degree rise of temperature until the flash occurs.

2. When a flashing point at or above 115° Fahrenheit is being observed the air chamber is to be filled to a depth of 1 in. with cold water before the oil cup containing the oil to be tested is placed in position.

3. The temperature at which a flash occurs, if not within 8° of the temperature at which the testing was commenced, is the observed flashing point of the oil, and by correction of the observed flashing point for atmospheric pressure as hereinafter described, the true flashing point is obtained.

4. If, however, the flash takes place at any temperature within go of the temperature at which the testing was commenced, the test is to be rejected, and the whole operation of testing is to be repeated with a fresh portion of the sample, the testing, however, to begin at 10° lower than the temperature at which the flash has been previously obtained. If necessary, this procedure shall be repeated with fresh portions of oil until a flash has been obtained at a tenperature not within 8° of the temperature at which the testing was commenced.

5. The temperature at which this last-mentioned flash occurs is the observed flashing point of the oil, and by correction of the observed flashing point for atmospheric pressure as hereinafter described, the true flashing point is obtained.

6. In repeating a test a fresh sample of oil must always be used, the tested sample being thrown away, and the cup must be wiped dry from any adhering oil, and cooled, as already described, before receiving the fresh sample.

7. If in any case no flash has occurred when a temperature has been reached which is not within 8° of the temperature at which the testing was commenced and which, after correction for atmospheric pressure, is not less than 73° Fahrenheit, and the tests are not required to be continued, the oil shall be deemed to have a true flashing point of not less than 73° Fahrenheit.

8. If no flash has occurred when a temperature has been reached which is not within 8° of the temperature at which the testing was commenced and which, after correction for atmospheric pressure, is not less than 100° Fahrenheit, and the tests are not required to be continued, the oil shall be deemed to have a true flashing point of not less than 100° Fahrenheit.

9. In the same manner if no flash has occurred when a temperature has been reached which is not within 8° of the temperature at which the testing was commenced and which, after correction for atmospheric pressure, is not less than 150° Fahrenheit, and the tests are not required to be continued, the oil shall be deemed to have a true flashing point of not less than 150° Fahrenheit.

V.- Correction for Atmospheric Pressure. As the flashing point of an oil is influenced by changes in atmospheric pressure to an average of 1.60 for every inch of the barometer, a correction of the observed flashing point is necessary whenever the barometer does not stand at 30 inches. This correction is to be made in the following manner :

If the barometer stands at less than 30 inches (the normal height of the barometer) add to the observed flashing point 1.6 times the difference (measured in inches) between the actual and normal barometer. If the barometer stands above 30 inches, deduct from the observed flashing point 1.6 times the difference between the actual and normal barometer.

The

Inflammable Oils Act.—1908.

The nearest whole number to the result of this correction is to be taken as the corrected flashing point, and if the result is exactly midway between two whole rumbers the higher whole number is to be taken.

For example: Suppose an oil has an observed flashing point of 72, the barometer being 27.1 inches, then the difference between 30.0 inches and 27:1 inches is 2.9 inches. This result multiplied by 1.6 is 4.61, which has to be added to 72, making 76.64. The nearest whole number to this is 77° which is to be taken as the corrected flashing point, and if the testing had been commenced at or below 64o the true flashing point is 77° Fahrenheit.

Again : Suppose the observed flashing point of an oil to be 96° and the testing had been commenced at 87o and the barometer indicated 30:6 inches. The true flashing point of the oil is the nearest whole number to 96 minus the product of 0.6 multiplied by 1.6, that is 95° Fahrenheit.

The readings of the barometer are to be corrected readings, in accordance with the corrections applicable to the instrument in use. The instrument must be compared periodically with the standard barometer at the office of the Government Analyst, and regulated thereby.

VI. Application of the Test to Viscous Fluids or Preparations. If the flashing test has to be applied to substances of a viscous or semi-solid nature which cannot be poured (such as solutions of indiarubber in mineral naphtha), the mode of proceeding is as follows:

One fluid ounce or two tablespoonfuls of the substance to be tested is placed in the cup, and the cover is put on. The air chamber in the water bath is filled with water to a depth of 1}in., and the temperature of the water bath is raised to 90°. The cup is then put into the bath, and the temperature of the water bath maintained at 90° throughout the test. After the lapse of fifteen minutes the test flame is to be applied. If no flash occurs the heating is continued for another fifteen minutes, and the testflame again applied, and so on until a flash takes place, or the temperature in the cup has reached 90°, and so on.

The temperature at which a flash occurs is the observed flashing point of the substance, and, subject to correction for atmospheric pressure as hereinbefore described, is the true flashing point.

Adelaide: By authority, C. E. BRISTUW, Government Printer, North Terrace.

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An Act to amend the Constitution.

[Assented to, December 2nd, 1908.] E it Enacted by the Governor of the State of South Australia,

with the advice and consent of the Parliament thereof, as follows:

BE

1. This Act may be cited as “ The Constitution Amendment Act, Short title and 1908,” and shall be incorporated with, and, so far as consistent with incorporation. the tenor thereof, shall be construed as one with “ The Constitution Act 779/1901, s. 1. Act” and “ The Electoral Code, 1896,” and any Acts amending or Act 667 of 1896. substituted for the same.

Act 2 of 1855-6.

2. Section 22 of “ The Constitution Act," and the whole of “The Repeal. Constitution Act Amendment Act, 1901,” are hereby repealed.

Act 779 of 1901.

3. From and after the passing of this Act, notwithstanding any. Future constitution of thing to the contrary contained in “ The Constitution Act,” or the Parliament. Acts amending the same, the Parliament of South Australia shall be Ibid., s. 4. constituted in manner hereinafter provided.

4. Subject to the provisions of section 21, the Legislative Council Legislative Council. shall consist of eighteen Members.

Ibid., s. 5.

5. The House of Assembly shall consist of forty-two Members. House of Assembly.

Ibid., s. 6. 6. South Australia, including the Northern Territory, shall be Council Districts. divided for electoral purposes into four Council Districts, each dis. Ibid., s. 7. tinguished by the names, and returning the number of Members,

and

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