Essays Philosophical and Theological, 1. köide

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W. V. Spencer, 1866
 

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Page 328 - That it might be fulfilled which was spoken by the prophet, saying, I will open my mouth in parables; I will utter things which have been kept secret from the foundation of the world.
Page 329 - The Arians of the Fourth Century; their Doctrine, Temper, and Conduct, chiefly as exhibited in the Councils of the Church, between AD 325 and AD 381.
Page 94 - Every human action has three aspects: its moral aspect, or that of its right and wrong; its (Esthetic aspect, or that of its beauty; its sympathetic aspect, or that of its loveableness. The first addresses itself to our reason and conscience; the second to our imagination; the third to our human fellow-feeling. According to the first, we approve or disapprove; according to the second, we admire or despise; according to the third, we love, pity, or dislike.
Page 144 - Nothing at first can appear more difficult to believe than that the more complex organs and instincts should have been perfected, not by means superior to, though analogous with human reason, but by the accumulation of innumerable slight variations, each good for the individual possessor.
Page 373 - How shall affrighted mortals dare To sing thy glory or thy grace, Beneath thy feet we lie so far, And see but shadows of thy face > Who can behold the blazing light ? Who can approach consuming flame * None but thy wisdom knows thy might ; None but thy word can speak thy name.
Page 121 - The Intellectual Development of Europe, considered with reference to the Views of Mr. Darwin and others, that the Progression of Organisms is determined by Law.
Page 226 - Absolute implies a possible existence out of all relation. We attempt to escape from this apparent contradiction, by introducing the idea of succession in time. The Absolute exists first by itself, and afterwards becomes a Cause. But here we are checked by the third conception, that of the Infinite. How can the Infinite become that which it was not from the first? If Causation is a possible mode of existence, that which exists without causing is not infinite; that which becomes a cause has passed...
Page 304 - God to forgive them also,' overlooks the fact that this duty is binding on man on account of the weakness, and ignorance, and sinfulness of his nature...
Page 226 - But here we are checked by the third conception, that of the Infinite. How can the Infinite become that which it was not from the first ? If Causation is a possible mode of existence, that which exists without causing is not infinite ; that which becomes a cause has passed beyond its former limits. Creation at any particular moment of time being thus inconceivable, the philosopher is reduced to the alternative of Pantheism, which pronounces the effect to be mere appearance, and merges all real existence...
Page 91 - Morality consists of two parts. One of these is self-education; the training, by the human being himself, of his affections and will. That department is a blank in Bentham's system. The other and coequal part, the regulation of his outward actions, must be altogether halting and imperfect without the first...

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