The Literary Essays of Thomas Merton

Front Cover
New Directions Publishing, 1985 - 549 pages
Discusses Blake, Joyce, Pasternak, Faulkner, Styron, O'Connor, Camus, symbolism, creativity, alienation, comtemplation, and freedom
 

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Contents

Edwin Muir
29
William Faulkner
92
Simone Weil
134
A Commentary and Introduction
181
Journals of the Plague Years
218
Violence and Nonviolence
232
Milton and Camus
252
Camus and the Church
261
A Reappraisal
338
Theology of Creativity
355
Message to Poets
371
Why Alienation Is for Everybody
381
Letter to Reference Librarian at Columbia December 2 1953
387
Background and Development
393
Blakes Ideas on the Place of Nature in Art
424
Bibliography
452

Lucidity and the Absurd
275
Poverty of an Antihero
292
Rubén Darío
305
Alfonso Cortes
311
Jorge Carrera Andrade
318
Poetry Symbolism and Typology
327
Early Literary Essays and Reviews 193940
457
Poetry
476
Huxleys Pantheon
490
The Wild Palms
515
Index
537
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About the author (1985)

Thomas Merton (1915-1968) entered the Cistercian Abbey of Gethsemani in Kentucky, following his conversion to Catholicism and was ordained in 1949. During the 1960s, he was increasingly drawn into a dialogue between Eastern and Western religions and was actively engaged with domestic issues of war and racism.

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