The National Music of America and Its Sources

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L. C. Page (incorporated), 1899 - 318 pages
 

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Page 191 - Their blood has washed out their foul footstep's pollution. No refuge could save the hireling and slave From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave...
Page 190 - Oh, say, can you see, by the dawn's early light, What so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming? Whose broad stripes and bright stars, through the perilous fight, O'er the ramparts we watched, were so gallantly streaming? And the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air, Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there.
Page 234 - We are a band of brothers, and native to the soil, Fighting for our liberty, with treasure, blood and toil; And when our rights were threatened, the cry rose near and far: Hurrah for the Bonnie Blue Flag that bears a Single Star!
Page 31 - So they left that goodly and pleasant city, which had been their resting-place near twelve years ; but they knew they were PILGRIMS, and looked not much on those things, but lifted up their eyes to the heavens, their dearest country, and quieted their spirits.
Page 191 - Power that hath made and preserved us a nation. Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just. And this be our motto. "In God is our trust...
Page 120 - And there's a nice youngster of excellent pith; Fate tried to conceal him by naming him Smith; But he shouted a song for the brave and the free— Just read on his medal, "My country,
Page 158 - Firm, united let us be, Rallying round our Liberty; As a band of brothers joined, Peace and safety we shall find.
Page 190 - O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave? On the shore, dimly seen through the mists of the deep, Where the foe's haughty host in dread silence reposes, What is that which the breeze, o'er the towering steep, As it fitfully blows, now conceals, now discloses?
Page 84 - Lero, lero, lilliburlero," that made an impression on the [King's] army, that cannot be imagined by those that saw it not. The whole army, and at last the people, both in city and country, were singing it perpetually. And perhaps never had so slight a thing so great an effect.
Page 158 - The object of the author was to get up an American spirit, which should be independent of, and above the interests, passions, and policy of both belligerents : and look and feel exclusively for our own honour and rights.

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