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G. Strachan.-A good man all round. A good bat, and, with con

fidence, a dangerous hitter. A splendid field anywhere, covering a deal of ground. With more practice would make

a good slow round arm bowler. F. Fulton.-As a bat did not come up to the expectations formed of

him in the early part of the season. Good field. Has

left. J. Wade. — Very fair left-handed bat. At times his bowling (right

handed) was successful. Has left. E. H. Watts.-A really good bat, and has much improved towards

the end of the season, especially in his hitting. Played in the London matches in place of Bramwell. Good long

stop. R. L. Steuart.-On his day a dangerous bowler, excelling in

shooters. A good painstaking bat, and will make runs

next season. Fine field anywhere. Has left. G. N. Wyatt.A very dangerous bat, hitting hard all round; but

must learn to be more steady. Fair change bowler. Brilliant anywhere in the field, having an irreproachable

return from long leg. G. D. Graham.—A very promising bat; but must be more dashing

in the field.

BOWLING AVERAGES.

Names.

Runs

Average Innings Overs. Maidens Runs. Wickets to a Wides. Wickets

Wicket.

per Inn.

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*

Played only in the London matches. t Got their colours this half.

C.C.R.C.

A simultaneous match against Marlborough was shot off on September 30th. The conditions were that we should shoot on two days, and take the highest score on one of those days; the other conditions were the same as at Wimbledon. The following was the result:

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213 Though there cannot be a doubt that the result was correct, we may remark that the weather here was very bad on both days, but at Marlborough they had one fine day without a breath of wind, which of course they took advantage of. Unfortunately at Marlborough they have to shoot according to the rules of the range, one peculiar rule of which is, that all ricochets count as direct hits,' consequently their scores are larger than they would have been had all the Wimbledon rules been carried out. An attempt was made to get up a match with Rossall, but as the conditions could not be agreed on, no match was shot between us.

10

Challenge Cup. The Challenge Cup was shot for on October 3rd. The following is the result:

200 yards. 500 yards. Total. Sergt. Savary

13

23 Capt. Baines

6

18 Ensign Sim

8

18 Private R. Williams

8

18 On shooting off the ties for second, Private R. Williams made an outer, and won second prize. The day being very cold and wet will partly account for the low scores made.

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Cup presented by Sergt. Savary (Handicap.) In order to stimulate the shooting in the match against Marlborough, it was decided that this cup should be given for the highest aggregate score on the two days, and that four points for every prize won should be taken from the scores of winners of former prizes. The following were the highest scores :Penalty.

Total. Private R. Williams

24
18

42 Capt. Baines

4
27
18

41 Sergt. Ellershaw

26 önsign Sim

26
18

32

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38

12

Cups presented by Mr. Samuelson.

These Cups were shot for on October 9th, between the Town and College Companies. The two Cups were won by members of the 13th Company (Town). The following are the best scores in the College ten :200 yards. 500 yards.

600 yards.

Total. Honry. Capt. Porcher 13

9

32 Ensign W. H. Sim..

35
Sergt. Savary..

13
13

4

30 Corp. Gibson ..

33

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600 yards.

Cup presented by Mr. Agg Gardner. This Cup was shot for on October 14th, and won by Private White, Toth Company; Ensign Sim, College Company, being second. The following are the best scores in the College ten. 200 yards. 500 yards.

Total. Honry. Capt. Porcher

8

28
Ensign W. H. Sim..
15

38
Sergt. Savary ..
14

5

30 Corp. Abercrombie..

14

9

35 Another Cup was afterwards given to Ensign W. H. Sim, by Mr. Agg Gardner, for the second highest score.

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Schreiber Vase.

This Cup was shot for on October 19th, and won by Private Taylor, 10th Company. Unfortunately no separate score of the College ten was kept, so the scores cannot be given heren

A. BAINES, Captain.

Our Contemporaries.

We have three numbers of The Marlburian to notice. No. 53 contains a review of George Eliot's 'Spanish Gypsy,' which is marked by feeling and insight; but one gets a little tired of the innumerable admiring notices of a work whose chief poetic guarantee is the name of its author. There is also a defence of Cricket, which it appears has not been attacked in The Marlburian: the article is decisively commented on in the following number by the supposed offender against the game, Kéyk. A ‘visit to Marlborough' by the detestable Johnson,' as reported by his satellite, is very amusing : but may one be forgiven for remarking that Dr. Johnson, if he had used slang at all on his visit, would assuredly not have used the word nip,' which is anything but cosmopolitan slang? From the notices to correspondents we gather that The Marlburian could be filled every fortnight with original poetry: we get none here, even to refuse. In No. 54 is 'Our Marlborough friends,' something in the style of some papers in The Cliftonian: they are always amusing. The · Marlborough Nomads,' old Marlburian Football Club, already muster about sixty members: they played their first match on October 10, at Blackheath, and are apparently very strong: among other matches, they are down to play Epsom College, Wimbledon and Blackheath Schools, Haileybury College, and R.M.A. Woolwich. S. H. Butcher is captain of the Marlborough Twenty. From Statistics of the past Cricket season,' we learn that out of 18 foreign matches, M.C.C.C. won 9, and lost 5; the rest drawn. R. Leach, the captain, scored 1028 runs in the season : his average is 35.8, C. S. Gordon's 31.2, W. E. Leach's 19.14. In bowling Gordon is facile princeps : his score being 24 innings bowled in, 2,431 balls, 607 overs, 1,296 runs, 120 maidens, 117 wickets, 3 wides; an average of 2.89 runs per over, 11.9 per wicket, 4.21 wickets per innings, no small achievement for a school slow-bowler. Hodgson has not much of an average as to wickets, 1.19 per innings, but as to runs he gives only 13.1 per wicket. In the list of long scores we notice F. Baker 77, not out, for the Wiltshire Wanderers. Seven of the M.C.C.C. XI. have left. There is in this number, No. 55, an exceedingly interesting article, consisting of extracts from letters about China. With regard to Football, we learn that “The duration of big game has at last been diminished to one hour; the game now generally lasts from a little before three o'clock to a little before four.' Marlborough Rifle Shooting seems to be particularly flourishing : we

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