The Works of Robert Burns, 3. köide

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A. Fullarton and Company, 1839
 

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Page 30 - O, WERT thou in the cauld blast, On yonder lea, on yonder lea, My plaidie to the angry airt, I'd shelter thee, I'd shelter thee. Or did misfortune's bitter storms Around thee blaw, around thee blaw, Thy bield should be my bosom, To share it a', to share it a'.
Page 61 - O' my sweet Highland Mary. How sweetly bloom'd the gay green birk, How rich the hawthorn's blossom, As underneath their fragrant shade I clasp'd her to my bosom ! The golden hours on angel wings Flew o'er me and my dearie; For dear to me as light and life Was my sweet Highland Mary. Wi' mony a vow and lock'd embrace Our parting was fu' tender; And pledging aft to meet again, We tore oursels asunder; But, Oh!
Page 138 - Should auld acquaintance be forgot And never brought to min' ? Should auld acquaintance be forgot And auld lang syne? For auld lang syne, my dear, For auld lang syne, We'll tak' a cup o' kindness yet, For auld lang syne.
Page 141 - Wha will be a traitor knave ? Wha can fill a coward's grave ? Wha sae base as be a slave? Let him turn and flee ! Wha for Scotland's king and law Freedom's sword will strongly draw, Freeman stand, or freeman fa...
Page 201 - He looks and laughs at a' that A prince can mak a belted knight, A marquis, duke, and a' that ; But an honest man's aboon his might, Guid faith he maunna fa' that : For a
Page 276 - ... out-of-the-way person. Such is the peculiar pleasure I take in the season of winter, more than the rest of the year. This I believe, may be partly owing to my misfortunes giving my mind a melancholy cast: but there is something even in the " Mighty tempest, and the hoary waste Abrupt and deep, stretch'd o'er the buried earth," — which raises the mind to a serious sublimity, favorable to every thing great and noble.
Page 40 - The sodger frae the wars returns, The sailor frae the main; But I hae parted frae my love, Never to meet again, My dear — Never to meet again. When day is gane, and night is come, And a...
Page 80 - Yestreen, when to the trembling string The dance gaed thro' the lighted ha', To thee my fancy took its wing, I sat, but neither heard or saw : Tho' this was fair, and that was braw, And yon the toast of a' the town, I sigh'd, and said amang them a',
Page 63 - Wi' mony a vow, and lock'd embrace, Our parting was fu' tender ; And, pledging aft to meet again, We tore oursels asunder ; But, Oh ! fell death's untimely frost, That nipt my flower sae early ! Now green's the sod, and cauld's the clay, That wraps my Highland Mary...
Page 61 - Again ye have heard that it hath been said by them of old time, Thou shalt not, forswear thyself, but shalt perform unto the Lord thine oaths...

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