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THE

ANTHROPOLOGICAL

REVIEW.

VOL. II.

18 6 4.

LONDON:
TRÜBNER & CO., 60, PATERNOSTER ROW.

1864.

T. RICHARD3, S7, GREAT QUEEN STREET.

CONTENTS OF VOL. II.

PAGE

On the Human Hair as a Race-Character. By Dr. Pruner-Bey

Pott on the Myths of the Origin of Man and Language ...

Italian Anthropology

On the Scytho-Cimmerian Languages ...

Notes on Scalping. By Richard F. Burton

Renan on the Shemitic Nations

Abnormal Distortion of the Wrist. By Charles H. Chambers

Human Remains from Lough Gur, County Limerick

Danish Kitcben-middens. By Charles H. Chambers .

Miscellanea Anthropologica

Inquiry into Consanguineous Marriages and Pure Races. By Dr. E. Dally

Peyrerius, and Theological Criticism. By Philalethes

109

Miscegenation ...

116

Anthropology in its Connection with Chemistry ...

Savage Africa ...

123

Ethnology and Phrenology as an Aid to the Biographer. By J. W. Jackson 126

The Proceedings of the Anthropological Society of Paris

141

Correspondence

Miscellanea Anthropologica

On the Distinction between Man and Animals. By Philalethes

On the Phenomena of Hybridity

164

Thoughts and Facts contributing to the History of Man

173

On the Importance of Methodical Classification in American Researches.

By A. De Bellecombe. Translated by W. H. Garrett, Esq., F.A.S.L. ...

Anthropotomy ...

202

Doyle's Chronicle of England

209

Anthropological Documents of the State of New York. By Geo. E.

Roberts, Esq., F.G.S., Hon. Sec. A.S.L.

210

Doherty's Organic Philosophy

213

Proceedings of the Anthropological Society of Paris

217

The Fossil Man of Abbeville again ...

220

Miscellanea Anthropologica

... 223

Notes on Waitz's Anthropology. By Captain R. F. Burton, V.P.A.S.L. 233

Bain on the Senses and the Intellect ...

250

The Gipsies in Egypt. By Alfred von Kremer ...

On the Ideas of Species and Race applied to Man and Human Society. By

M. Cournot

Slavery. By James Reddie, Esq., F.A.S.L.

... 280

Anthropology at the British Association. A.D. 1864

294

Burton's Mission to Dahome. By W. Winwood Reade, F.A.S.L,, F.R.G.S. 335

Miscellanea Anthropologica

... ... 344

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JOURNAL OF THE ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF LONDON.

Carter Blake on the Anthropological Papers read at Newcastle

G. E. Roberts and Professor Busk on the Opening of a Cist of the

Stone Age

Captain Eustace W. Jacob on Indian Tribes of Vancouver's Island

Dr. James Hunt on the Negro's Place in Nature

C. R. Markham on Quartz Cutting Instruments from Chanduy

G. E. Roberts on Mammalian Bones from Audley End ...

xli

A. Bryson on Arrow Heads from the Bin of Cullen

lxiv

Dr. F. R. Fairbank on Flint Arrow Heads from Canada ...

Ixiv
Count Oscar Reichenbach on the Vitality of the Negro Race

Ixy-

General Meeting of the Society ...

Ixxiv

Presidents Annual Address

Ixxx

R. Lee on the Extinction of Races

xor

T. Bendyshe on the Extinction of Races

Xcxix-

Dr. C. G. Carus on the Construction of the Upper Jaw of a Greenlander cxiv

C. Carter Blake's Report on same subject ...

ib.

Jas. Reddie on Anthropological Desiderata ...

CXV

Rev. J. M. Joass on some Pre-historic Dwellings in Ross-shire ; with

an Introduction by George E. Roberts ...

CXXXV

C. Carter Blake on the alleged Peculiar Characters, and assumed Anti.

quity of the Human Cranium from the Neanderthal ...

... cxxxix

Alfred R. Wallace on the Origin of Human Races, etc. ...

Schlagintweit on some Ethnographical Casts, etc. ... ... clxxxviii

Dr. Shortt on the Domber

... clxxxix

Pike on the Place of the Science of Mind and Language in the

Science of Man ...

Guppy on the Capabilities of the Negro for Civilisation ...

Farrar on the Universality of Belief in God, and in a Future State ...

coxvii

Farrar on Hybridity ..

ccxxii

Burton and Carter Blake on Skulls from Annabom in the West

African Seas

COXXX

Thurnam on the Two Principal forms of Crania in the Early Britons ccxxxi

Bollaert on the Palæography of the New World

...

ccxxxvi

Bendyshe on the Precautions which ought to have been taken to ensure

the health of British Troops had any been sent to Copenhagen ... ccxxxvii

Roberts and Bolton on the Kirkhead Cave, near Ulverstone

coli

Blake and Roberts on Human Remains from Peterborough

celiv

Bollaert on the Alleged Introduction of Syphilis from the New World... colvi

Gibb on Extreme Hypertrophy of the Skull ...

cclx

Roberts and Carter Blake on a Jaw from Buildwas Abbey, Salop ... cclxii

Carter Blake on Human Remains from Kent's Hole, Torquay

cclxiji

a Bone Cave in Brazil

cclxv

Broca on Skulls from the Basque Provinces, and from a Cave of the
Bronze Period ...

cclxviii

Pusey on the Negro in Relation to Civilised Society

cclxxiv

THE

ANTHROPOLOGICAL REVIEW.

FEBRUARY, 1864.

ON HUMAN HAIR AS A RACE-CHARACTER, EXAMINED

BY THE AID OF THE MICROSCOPE.

By DR. PRUNER-BEY..

PRELIMINARY OBSERVATIONS. FROM the highest antiquity has the human hair attracted the attention of observers; but, down to a very recent period, it was merely the contour and the external aspect which were taken into consideration. These two characters were thus at all times indicated as distinguishing nations and individuals. The terms lelótpixes, ovlótpiges, Favooi, muppoi, etc., constantly occur in Greek authors and their successors.

Modern science has somewhat enlarged the field of observation as regards colour; but it was only by the use of the microscope that we are enabled to add fresh characters to those accessible to the naked eye. It is by these means that Heusinger was enabled to indicate the elliptic form of the hair of the Negro. Koelliker confirmed this observation, and added other characters. Erdl applied the microscope to the study of the colour in animals. Brown finally, according to the tendency of the American school, published in the remarkable work of Schoolcraft, his researches, in which he endeavours to establish specific characters, or nearly so, for the hair of the Aryan, the Negro, the Chinese, and the American, both in the form of the bulb and the body, and also in the structure of the latter, at least as regards the presence or the absence of the so-called medullary canal.

This question has for many years excited my warmest interest.

* Read before the Anthropological Society of Paris, March 19, 1803. VOL. II.-NO. IV.

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