The Twentieth Century, 10. köide

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Nineteenth Century and After, 1881
 

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Page 286 - All thinking things, all objects of all thought, And rolls through all things. Therefore am I still A lover of the meadows and the woods, ' And mountains ; and of all that we behold From this green earth; of all the mighty world Of eye and ear, both what they half create *, And what perceive...
Page 17 - Seek the Lord while He may be found, call upon Him while He is near. Let the wicked forsake his way, and the unrighteous man his thoughts; let him return to the Lord, and He will have mercy on him; and to our God, for He will abundantly pardon.
Page 11 - But yesterday, the word of Caesar might Have stood against the world : now lies he there, And none so poor to do him reverence.
Page 265 - Happy is the man that hath his quiver full of them : they shall not be ashamed when they speak with their enemies in the gate.
Page 848 - Damn with faint praise, assent with civil leer, And, without sneering, teach the rest to sneer; Willing to wound and yet afraid to strike, Just hint a fault and hesitate dislike...
Page 444 - God hath tempered the body together, having given more abundant honour to that part which lacked: that there should be no schism in the body, but that the members should have the same care one for another. And whether one member suffer, all the members suffer with it; or one member be honoured, all the members rejoice with it.
Page 414 - For the first time for many months it seems possible to send you a few words ; merely, however, for Remembrance and Farewell. On higher matters there is nothing to say. I tread the common road into the great darkness, without any thought of fear, and with very much of hope. Certainty indeed I have none. With regard to You and Me I cannot begin to write ; having nothing for it but to keep shut the lid of those secrets with all the iron weights that are in my power. Towards me it is still more true...
Page 722 - He shall judge the poor of the people, he shall save the children of the needy, and shall break in pieces the oppressor.
Page 42 - I will meet it and defy it.' And as I so thought, there rushed like a stream of fire over my whole soul, and I shook base fear away from me forever. I was strong; of unknown strength; a spirit; almost a god. Ever from that time the temper of my misery was changed ; not fear or whining sorrow was it, but indignation and grim fire-eyed defiance.
Page 632 - O, we poor orphans of nothing — alone on that lonely shore — Born of the brainless Nature who knew not that which she bore ! Trusting no longer that earthly flower would be heavenly fruit — Come from the brute, poor souls — no souls — and to die with the brute...

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