The Indian Forester, 10. köide

Front Cover
R.P. Sharma, 1884
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page lv - THE Honourable the Governor in Council is pleased to publish for general information the following Rule, Ordinance and Regulation I.
Page 571 - ... from thirty to fifty individuals, but much larger numbers, even one hundred, are by no means uncommon. When large herds are in localities where fodder is not very plentiful, they divide into parties of from ten to twenty ; these remain separate, though within two or three miles of each other. But they all take, part in any common movement, such as a march into another tract of forest. The different parties keep themselves informed at all times of each other's whereabouts, chiefly by their fine...
Page 533 - Singhalese have a superstition in relation to the close of life in the elephant : they believe that, on feeling the approach of dissolution, he repairs to a solitary valley, and there resigns himself to death. A native who accompanied Mr Cripps when hunting in the forests of Anarajapoora, intimated to him that he was then in the immediate vicinity of the spot ' to which the elephants come to die...
Page 436 - They dwelt amidst the forests as they wandered on the waves, and saw no end nor any other horizon. Still the dark, green trees, or the dark, green waters jagged the dawn with their fringe or their foam. And whatever elements of imagination, or of warrior strength, or of domestic justice were brought down by the Norwegian or the Goth against the dissoluteness or degradation of the south of Europe were taught them under the green roofs and wild penetralia of the pine.
Page 529 - ... only covered with a few sticks and leaves. Its fellows make no effort to assist the fallen one, as they might easily do by kicking in the earth around the pit, but flee in terror.
Page 435 - WITHIN a few years a portion of these swamps have been planted with eucalyptus trees, and they have had a wonderful effect on the healthfulness of the atmosphere, and people now reside in these parts during the Summer, where but a short time ago it was impossible to live. The eucalyptus tree is now being introduced into the everglades of Florida in order to purify the air in these unhealthy regions of the State.
Page 500 - It is," says Dr. Brandis (' Ocean Highways,' Oct. 1872, p. 204), " a widely spread notion, entertained by many writers who are competent to judge, that forests increase, the rainfall, and that the denudation of a country in a warm climate diminishes its moisture. Much of what is known regarding the history and the present state of the countries round the Mediterranean seems to support this theory, but it has not yet been established by conclusive evidence.
Page 509 - ... on their legs during the irrigation of the spring crops ; and all the husbandman can do is just to keep his poor brutes alive on the chopped leaves of the few trees and shrubs he has access to, the roots of grass and herbs that he digs out of the edges of fields, and the like. In good years, he just succeeds ; in bad years, the weakly ones die of starvation. But then come the rains. Within the week, as though by magic, the burning sands are carpeted with rank, luscious herbage, the cattle will...
Page 123 - I will draw your attention to the advisability of cultivating forests on places suitable for the supply of water, and especially along watercourses and lakes as means of purifying these, preventing too great evaporation, supplying food for fish, and providing these with shade against the rays of the summer sun, and shelter from the pelting rains, the hail and the tempests. Salmon fishing and all freshwater fishing depend upon proper attention to this matter, and I feel certain that if the true causes...
Page 435 - Apennine and Sabinian Mountain range and its slopes were covered with its natural growth of trees, the now detested Roman Campagnas, which constitute the largest part of the Pontine swamps, were a beautiful section of country. They were then adorned with sumptuous Summer residences, villas, parks, flower and fruit gardens of the Roman aristocrats. After the destruction of the forests, the whole region became unhealthy, and almost absolutely uninhabitable on account of the malarious gases emanating...

Bibliographic information