Goldsmith's Natural history, with notes collected, with a life of O. Goldsmith by G.M. Bussey, by H. Innes

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Page xviii - I perceived that he had already changed my guinea, and had got a bottle of Madeira and a glass before him. I put the cork into the bottle, desired he would be calm, and began to talk to him of the means by which he might be extricated.
Page xviii - I put the cork into the bottle, desired he would be calm, and began to talk to him of the means by which he might be extricated. He then told me that he had a novel ready for the press, which he produced to me. I looked into it, and saw its merit; told the landlady I should soon return, and having gone to a bookseller sold it for sixty pounds. I brought Goldsmith the money, and he discharged his rent, not without rating his landlady in a high tone for having used him so ill.
Page xix - I was empowered to pay most liberally for his exertions ; and, would you believe it ! he was so absurd as to say ' I can earn as much as will supply my wants without writing for any party ; the assistance you offer is therefore unnecessary to me...
Page xvi - India voyage, nor are my resolutions altered ; though, at the same time, I must confess, it gives me some pain to think I am almost beginning the world at the age of thirtyone. Though I never had a day's sickness since I saw you, yet I am not that strong, active man you once knew me. You scarcely can conceive how much eight years of disappointment, anguish, and study have worn me down.
Page 52 - While thus exerting himself, a bystander destitute of sight would suppose that the whole feathered tribe had assembled together, on a trial of skill, each striving to produce his utmost effect ; so perfect are his imitations. He many times deceives the sportsman, and sends him in search of birds that perhaps...
Page x - Frugality, and even avarice, in the lower orders of mankind, are true ambition. These afford the only ladder for the poor to rise to preferment. Teach, then, my dear sir, to your son thrift and economy. Let his poor wandering uncle's example be placed before his eyes.
Page xxv - How often have I blest the coming day, When toil remitting lent its turn to play, And all the village train, from labour free, Led up their sports beneath the spreading tree; While many a pastime circled in the shade, The...
Page xv - I know of no misery but a gaol to which my own imprudencies and your letter seem to point. I have seen it inevitable these three or four weeks, and, by heavens ! request it as a favour, as a favour that may prevent somewhat more fatal. I have been some years struggling with a wretched being, with all that contempt which indigence brings with it, with all those strong passions which make contempt insupportable.
Page xxvi - Historian, Who left no species of writing untouched, or Unadorned by his pen, Whether to move laughter, Or draw tears : He was a powerful master Over the affections, Though at the same time a gentle tyrant ; Of a genius at once sublime, lively, and Equal to every subject: In expression at once noble, Pure, and delicate.
Page xxii - ' cried the Doctor, and lo, on uncovering the shillings, which had been dispersed, each beneath a separate hat, they were all found 90 congregated under one.

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