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HINTS FOR SERMONS.

I. There Mall be weeping, and gnashing of teeth, &c.

Page 343 II. It is the Lord, &c.

345 III, Lord teach us to pray, as John, &c. 347 IV. Time and chance, &c.

351 V. I keep under my body, &c.

353 VI. Be mindful of the words, &c.

355 VII. Pure religion, &c.

357 VIII. Charity shall cover, &c.

359 IX. Is any among you affli&ted, &c.

363 X. As new born babes, &c.

365 XI. We both labour and suffer reproach, &c. 367 XII. If riches increase, &c.

370 XIII. Out of the heart, &c.

373 XIV. I see the heavens opened, &c.

375 XV. The kingdom of heaven is like a net, &c. 377 XVI. Cease to do evil, &c.

380 XVII. Happy is he who coñdemneth not himself, &c.

381 XVIII. The Scribes and Pharisees fit in Moses' seat, &c.

382 XIX, This people honoureth me with their

383

lips, &c.

XX. What is a man profited? Page 384 XXI. Christ died for our fins, &c.

385 XXII. A short and connected view of God's

dispensations and revelations to man-
kind

387 XXIII. Except ye be born of water and the

390

Spirit, &c.

Analysis of St. Paul's Epistle to the Romans
Illustrations used by St. Paul in his writings

393 405

SER

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[Preached at the Primary Visitation of the Bishop of

Winchester, held at Southampton, July 15, 1788.]

I cor ii. 13.

WHICH THINGS WE SPEAK, NOT IN THE WORDS,

WHICH MAN's WISDOM TEACHETH; BUT WHICH THE HOLY GHOST TEACHETH, COMPARING SPIRITUAL THINGS WITH SPI

RITUAL.

W!

"HEN St. Paul planted the gospel at Co

rinth, he found his designs chiefly opposed by two kinds of people.

The first were men of pleasure. Corinth lay commodiously for trade; and trade produces VOL. IV.

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riches;

riches; and it had been early observed, that it was difficult for rich men to enter into the kingdom of heaven. They were more disposed to the pleasures, which riches furnish; than to the comforts, which religion administers : and even they, who had embraced christianity, found much work for the apostle in keeping them pure

from the contagion, that was spread around them.

Besides the gay, and thoughtless, the apostle had another kind of people to contend with. These were philosophers: and tho' they were a more respectable set of men than the other, they 'were, at the same time, perhaps more intractable. A state of learning is in itself, no doubt, fávourable to religion, at least in a certain degree; and has ever been found fo: but the philosopher himself has sometimes too much wisdom to be taught. The Corinthian philosophers certainly had; and were in general rather inclined to add something of their own to amend the gospel; thân to accept it in that fimplicity, in which Paul preached it.

To the latter the text alludes. These philosophizing christians (many of whom were probably teachers also) the apostle recalls to the fimplicity of the gospel. He sets before them his own ex-5

ample.

ample. He came not, he tells them, with the excellency of speech, or the enticing words of man's wisdom. He knew nothing among them, but Jesus Christ, and him crucified: adding, that he had never preached the words, which man's wifdom teacheth; but which the Holy Ghost teacheth ; comparing spiritual things with spiritual.

In this paffage the apostle gives us the only true rule of interpreting scripture, which I shall endeavour to explain, by Thewing-first, How the apostles were directed by it-And, secondly, How far it seems applicable to us.

I. In the first place, the apostle tells us, he avoided the words, which man's wisdom teacheth.

- In the apostle's days, indeed, man's wisdom had made but little progress in matters of religion. We read of Hymeneus, Philetus, and a few others, who feemed defirous of being teachers, before they understood what they affirmed. But their number was small,

Man's wisdom, however, was a kind of leaven, which made a rapid progrefs. We need only cursorily examine ecclefiaftical history to see it's mischievous effects. There we find men running such lengths of folly, extravagance, wild

ness,

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