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tion into the inner chambers of the liv- which I had made for the purpose, and ing eye, and displays its wonders and was examined, by the aid of a modificaits beauties. The observation is per- tion which I devised of Liebreich’s defectly painless, and may easily be ef- monstrating ophthalmoscope, by many fected: rabbits, for example, submit score of observers. Mine has the adto it with great calmness and compos- vantage of being adapted for use even ure, and at the College of Physicians' amid a blaze of light, and it cannot easisoirée, last year, a little pet white rab- ly be disarranged; two qualities valu. bit of mine sat up calmly in a box able in an instrument for demonstration.

From The Lamp.

THE PILGRIMAGE TO KEVLAAR.

FROM TIIE GERMAN.

The mother stood at the window,

The son he lay in bed ;
“ Here's a procession, Wilhelm ;

Wilt not look out ?" she said.

“I am so ill, my mother,

In the world I have no part;
I think upon dead Gretchen,

And a death-pang rends my heart."

“Rise up; we will to Kevlaar;

Will staff and rosary take ;
God's Mother there will cure thee,--

Thy sick heart whole will make."

The Church's banner fluttered,

The Church's hymns arose;
And unto fair Cöln city

The long procession goes,

The mother joined the pilgrims,

Her sick son leadeth she;
And both sing in the chorus,

Gelobt seyst du, Marie !"*

II.
The holy Mother in Kevlaar

To-day is well arrayed,
To-day hath much to busy her,
For many sick ask her aid.

" Praised be thou, Mary!"

And many sick people bring her

Such offerings as are meet; Many waxen limbs they bring her,

Many waxen hands and feet.

And who a wax hand bringeth,

His hand is healed that day ; And who a wax foot bringeth,

With sound feet goes away.

Many went there on crutches

Who now on the rope can spring; Many play now on the viol

Whose hands could not touch a string.

The mother she took a waxen light,

And shaped therefrom a heart; " Take that to the Mother of Christ,” she said,

“ And she will heal thy smart.”

He sighed, and took the waxen heart,

And went to the church in woe;
The tears from his eyes fell streaming,

The words from his heart came low.

“ Thou that art lighly blessed,

Thou Mother of Christ!” said he ; " Thou that art queen of heaven,

I bring my griefs to thec.
I dwell in Cöln with my mother;

In Cöln upon the Rhine,
Where so many hundred chapels

And so many churches shine.

And near unto us dwelt Gretchen;

But dead is Gretchen now. Marie, I bring a waxen heart,

My heart's despair heal thou.

Heal thou my sore heart-sickness;

So I will sing to thee
Early and late with fervent love,

* Gelobt seyst du, Marie !!

III.

The sick son and the mother

In one chamber slept that night; And the holy Mother of Jesus

Glid in with footsteps light.

She bowed her over the sick man's bed,

And one fair hand did lay

Upon his throbbing bosom,

Then smiled and passed away.

It seemed a dream to the mother,

And she had yet seen moro
But that her sleep ivas broken,

For the dogs howled at the door.
Upon his bed extended

lier son lay, and was dead;
And o'er his thin pale visage streamed

The morning's lovely red.
Her hands the mother folded,

Yet not a tear wept she ;
But sang in low devotion,

Gelobt seyst du, Marie !"

MARY HOVITI

From The Readcr.

THE ANCIENT LAWS OF IRELAND.

Dublin : Thom.)

Ancient Laws of Ireland. Vol. I. Irish Academy, of the British Museum, Printed for Iler Majesty's Station- and in the Bodleian Library at Oxford ery Olice. (London: Longman. The transcriptions occupy more than

5,000 manuscript pages, including all

the law tracts which it was thought This is a curious book, throwing necessary to publish, and have nearly some glimmerings of light upon a very all been translated; but the two remo:e' and obscure period of Irish chosen scholars did not live to cornhistory

. In 1832 a government com- plete and revise their translations. mission, called the “ Brehon Law The portion now published was preCommission,” was issued to the Lori pared for the press by W. Neilson Chancellor of Ireland, Lord Rosse, Tancock, LL.D., first in conjunction Dean Graves, Dr. Petrie, and others, with Dr. O'Donovan, and, after his appointing them to carry into effect death, with the Rev. Mr. O'Mahony, the selection, transcription, and trans- professor of Irish in the university lation of certain documents in the of Dublin. It is a volume of some Gaelic tongue containing portions of 300 pages, the Irish on one page and the ancient laws of Ireland, and the the translation opposite, containing povparation of the same for publica- the first part of the Sinchus Mor (we tion. In pursuance of this, the com are not told how much is to follow), misioners employed Dr. O'Donovan treating of the law of distress or disand Professor O'Curry, two Gaelic traint, with an Irish introduction, and scholars of high distinction, to trans- various Irish glosses and commentaries cribe and translate various law tracts

on the text. in the Irish language in the library of

The title Sonchus Alor (pronounced Trinity College, Dublin, of the Royal“ Shanchus Môr") for which seven or

VOL. II. 9

And many sick people bring her

Such offerings as are meet; Many waxen limbs they bring her,

Dany waxen bands and feet.

And who a wax hand bringeth,

His hand is healed that day; And who a wax foot bringeth,

With sound feet goes away.

Many went there on crutches

Who now on the rope can spring; Many play now on the viol

Whose hands could not touch a string.

The mother she took a waxen light,

And shaped therefrom a heart; “ Take that to the Mother of Christ,” she said,

“ And she will heal thy smart.”

He sighed, and took the waxen heart,

And went to the church in woe;
The tears from his eyes fell streaming,

The words from his heart came low.

“ Thou that art highly blessed,

Thou Mother of Christ!" said he;
Thou that art queen of heaven,
I bring my griefs to thec.

I dwell in Cöln with my mother;

In Cöln upon the Rhine, Where so many hundred chapels

And so many churches shine.

And near unto us dwelt Gretchen ;

But dead is Gretchen now. Marie, I bring a waxen heart,

My heart's despair heal thou.

Heal thou my sore heart-sickness;

So I will sing to thee
Early and late with fervent love,

Gelobt seyst du, Marie !! »

III.

The sick son and the mother

In one chamber slept that night; And the holy Mother of Jesus

Glid in with footsteps light.

She bowed her over the sick man's bed,

And one fair hand did lay

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Ancient Laws of Ireiand. Vol. I. Irish Academy, of the British Museum, Printed for Her Majesty's Station- and in the Bodleian Library at Oxford ery Office. (London: Longman. The transcriptions occupy more than Dublin : Thom.)

15,000 manuscript pages, including all

the law tracts which it was thought This is a curious book, throwing necessary to publish, and have nearly some glimmerings of light upon a very all been translated; but the two remote' and obscure period of Irish chosen scholars did not live to comhistory. In 1852 a government com- plete and revise their translations. mission, called the “ Brehon Law The portion now published was preCommission," was issued to the Lord pared for the press by W. Neilson Chancellor of Ireland, Lord Rosse, Hancock, LL.D., first in conjunction Dean Graves, Dr. Petrie, and others, with Dr. O'Donovan, and, after his appointing thein to carry into effect death, with the Rev. Mr. O'Mahony, the selection, transcription, and trans- professor of Irish in the university lation of certain documents in the of Dublin. It is a volume of some Gaelic tongue containing portions of 300 pages, the Irish on one page and the ancient laws of Ireland, and the the translation opposite, containing preparation of the same for publica- the first part of the Sinchus Mor (we tion. In pursuance of this, the com- are not told how much is to follow), missioners employed Dr. O'Donovan treating of the law of distress or disand Professor O’Curry, two Gaelic traint, with an Irish introduction, and scholars of high distinction, to trans- various Irish glosses and commentaries cribe and translate various law tracts on the text. in the Irish language in the library of The title Sonchus Mor (pronounced Trinity College, Dublin, of the Royal “ Shanchus Môr") for which seven or

VOL. II. 9

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