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DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE

JULIUS KLEIN, Director

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Sold by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office

Washington, D. C.

UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

WASHINGTON

1928

guze
2-25-1929

CONTENTS

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Wood-consuming industries-Continued.

Furniture...

220

Fashions and tendencies.

220

Principal manufacturing centers.

221

Dining-room furniture..

221

Bedroom furniture.

222

Inexpensive furniture.

225

Upholstered furniture.

225

Antique furniture.

225

Kitchen furniture.

225

Office furniture.

226

School furniture.

226

Moisture content of lumber

228

Dimension stock..

228

Use of plywood.

229

Exhibitions.

229

Future outlook..

229

Importance to American lumber exporters.. 230

Cooperage

230

Import trade.

230

Consuming industries.

237

The cooperage industry-

244

Outlook for American staves.

248

Shipbuilding-

250

Location of principal shipyards...

251

Quantity used in standard construction. 252

Principal uses.

252

Motor vehicles.

257

Passenger cars.

258

Trucks.

259

Oinnibuses.

259

Purchases and method of use.

260

Criticism of American ash..

260

Use of plywood..

262

Future outlook..

262

Millwork.

263

Principal woods used.

263

Purchase of supplies.

264

Trade organization.

264

Equipment of mills.

264

Manufactured products...

265

Competition from wood substitutes. 267

Utilization of waste..

267

Bank, office, and store fittings.

268

Bank and office fittings.

268

Store fixtures and fittings

268

Wood-block paving--

271

Organization of paving industry-

271

Woods used.

272

Prices of north European paving stock.. 272

Size of blocks and method of laying-

272

American opportunities..

273

Dock and harbor construction.

275

Method of construction...

275

Principal woods used...

275

Use of substitutes ...

278

Boxes, crates, and packing cases.

279

Species used and sources of supply.

279

Production...

279

Box shooks..

280

American participation..

281

Musical instruments.

282

FOREWORD

The United Kingdom is the largest wood-importing country in the world, imports of wood and wood manufactures during 1927 being valued at approximately $277,000,000. Of the countries that supply the British market the United States ranks third, being surpassed only by Finland and Sweden. The value of these imports from the United States during 1927 amounted to $42,000,000, or slightly over 15 per cent of the total British wood imports, which is practically the same percentage as obtained in 1913. The actual volume, however, is materially less, owing to the appreciation in values that have taken place since that time. In point of value the United Kingdom is the the most important foreign lumber market of the United States, taking during 1926 over 185,000,000 feet of hardwood lumber, valued at $13,500,000, for use by the furniture, interior fixture and fitting, and motor vehicle industries. In addition to hardwoods about 128,000,000 feet of softwoods, principally southern pine, Douglas fir, and spruce, are also exported annually to that market for use where large sizes or special qualities are required. Approximately 80 per cent of the mahogany lumber imported by the United Kingdom is supplied by the United States, it being manufactured here from logs imported largely from Central American countries.

Cooperage stock, doors, handles, and various other wood manufactures are also exported to Great Britain, the value of these during 1926 being approximately $12,500,000. An outstanding feature of these exports has been the rapid increase in the use of American doors in the British market, exports of which increased from 366,000 in 1924 to 1,514,000 in 1927. The increase is largely accounted for by the fact that American mass-production methods enable delivery of American-made doors in the United Kingdom at less than the cost of their domestic article.

This monograph, prepared by A. E. Boadle, American trade commissioner, is the result of an extensive investigation in the United Kingdom. Import trade is discussed in detail with special references to the principal woods imported and their chief uses, particular attention being given to those coming from the United States. The organization and operations of the import trade, the requirements of the principal wood-using industries, and factors that must be taken into consideration if business is to be successfully done in the British market are also covered. With improving industrial conditions in the United Kingdom opportunities for an increase in American

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